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I need help understanding Haskell expression evaluation. Take for example:

group . sort $ [1,2,3]  

This is my idea of how the expression is evaluated, am I totally wrong?
1. . is evaluated first, this creates the function Ord a => [a] -> [[a]]
2. $ is evaluated, this evaluates the right side of $
3. The right side of $ is fed as a parameter to the function on the left side of $

How do spaces (highest precedence?) tie in all to this?

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There are no spaces here, not ones with precedence, anyway. –  Karolis Juodelė Aug 22 '12 at 19:06
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@Karolis, I think the poster means function application. –  Paul Johnson Aug 22 '12 at 19:13
    
The order of evaluation is exactly the same as in 2 + 3 * 4. –  sdcvvc Aug 22 '12 at 23:58
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@PaulJohnson, I know, as I said, there is no normal application in that line. Just $ and . –  Karolis Juodelė Aug 23 '12 at 5:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The expression tree has ($) at the top, with (group . sort) and [1,2,3] as children. I can see this since (.) has a higher priority # of 9 and binds more tightly than ($) with priority 0:

Prelude> :i (.)
(.) :: (b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> c   -- Defined in `GHC.Base'
infixr 9 .

Prelude> :i ($)
($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b   -- Defined in `GHC.Base'
infixr 0 $

The (group . sort) has (.) as the top and group and sort as parameters. The [1,2,3] desugars to (1:(2:(3:([])))). This is the parsed expression tree.

It is evaluated by forcing the (group . sort), to get a function, and then passing [1,2,3] unevaluated to this function.

(group . sort) is \xs -> group (sort xs) and so this becomes group (sort [1,2,3]). group looks at the outmost constructor of (sort [1,2,3]) which forces (sort [1,2,3]) to produce (1 : thunk) where thunk will eventually be evaluated to [2,3].

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