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I have a model object which includes a boolean flag. I want to show the value of the flag using a UISwitch. The value can be changed in two ways:

  1. First by the user by toggling the switch. I register the UIControlEventTouchUpInside for that. I also tried UIControlEventValueChanged – it has the exact same effect.
  2. Second by some external state change. I use a timer to check for that state change and set the on property of the switch accordingly.

However, setting the value of the switch in the timer method has the effect that the touchUpInside action is sometimes not triggered even though the user has touched the switch.

So I face the following problem: If I set the switch state in the timer when the state changes externally, I loose some state changes from the user. If I don't use the timer I get all state changes from the user. However, I miss all the external state changes, then.

Now I have run out of ideas. How can I achieve what I want, getting both types of state changes in the model and reflected them correctly in the switch view?

Here is a minimal example that shows the problem. I have replaced the model object by a simple boolean flag, and in the timer I don't change the flag at all, I just call setOn:animated:. I count the invocations of the action method. Like that I can easily find out how many touches were missed:

#import "BPAppDelegate.h"
#import "BPViewController.h"

@implementation BPAppDelegate {
    NSTimer *repeatingTimer;
}

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: (NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    self.window = [[UIWindow alloc] initWithFrame:[[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds]];
    BPViewController *viewController = [[BPViewController alloc] init];
    self.window.rootViewController = viewController;
    [self.window makeKeyAndVisible];
    [self startTimer];
    return YES;
}

- (void) startTimer {
    repeatingTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval: 0.2
                                                      target: self.window.rootViewController
                                                    selector: @selector(timerFired:)
                                                    userInfo: nil
                                                     repeats: YES];
}

@end


#import "BPViewController.h"

@implementation BPViewController {
    UISwitch *uiSwitch;
    BOOL value;
    int count;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    value = true;
    uiSwitch = [[UISwitch alloc] init];
    uiSwitch.on = value;
    [uiSwitch addTarget:self action:@selector(touchUpInside:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
    [self.view addSubview:uiSwitch];
}

- (void)touchUpInside: (UISwitch *)sender {
    count++;
    value = !value;
    NSLog(@"touchUpInside: value: %d, switch: %d, count: %d", value, sender.isOn, count);
}

- (void) timerFired: (NSTimer*) theTimer {
    NSLog(@"timerFired: value: %d, switch: %d, count: %d", value, uiSwitch.isOn, count);
    // set the value according to some external state. For the example just leave it.
    [uiSwitch setOn:value animated:false];
}

@end
share|improve this question

Use UIControlEventValueChanged to determine when the switch has been toggled (programmatically or by the user). Don't use touchUpInside.

Also, don't replicate a property (e.g. your value property) that is already maintained by the UISwitch (i.e. the "on" property)...its redundant and will just get you into trouble

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I also tried UIControlEventValueChanged. It has the same effect, i.e. the action method is not called even though the user has touched the switch. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 19:35
1  
Regarding the flag. The code is just a minimal example. In reality I have a model object with a boolean attribute. As a model object I separated it from the view because I want to use the MVC pattern. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 19:38
    
gotcha, you can just update your model when you get the UIControlEventValueChanged notification. The UIControlEventValueChanged only gets called when the switch is actually toggled, not touched. – CSmith Aug 22 '12 at 20:09
    
and see @jrturton answer below, this is a very important observation – CSmith Aug 22 '12 at 20:25
    
Your answer is the right one, but mine didn't really fit in a comment. – jrturton Aug 22 '12 at 20:59

Your timer is firing so often it probably prevents the switch ever finishing the animated transition to the alternative value, so it never sends the valueChanged event message. You are setting the value to YES every 0.2 seconds which is faster, I think, than the duration of the animation that occurs when the user taps the switch.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. This is exactly the reason why I did not use valueChanged but touchUpInside:. An argument can be made that valueChanged should not be triggered if the switch already had the opposite state. However, touchUpInside should always happen, regardless of the switch value. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 21:04
    
If I change the timer to 0.5 seconds the touchUpInside events do get deleted less often. However, if the timing is bad, I still miss user events. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 21:07
    
I added a log statement to the timerFired: method. What is interesting that the on state of the switch is set to the new value before the animation finishes. Exactly when this happens, the action method does not get sent anymore. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 21:46
    
This is how it looks when the timing is good: timerFired: value: 1, switch: 1, count: 0 touchUpInside: value: 0, switch: 0, count: 1 timerFired: value: 0, switch: 0, count: 1 – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 21:54

EDIT: The following code does exactly what you want, if not exactly the way you want it. If insures that both timer changes and touch changes to the control receive an action method. The method is only going to be sent once per change, which is hopefully what you want.

Note the switch to UIControlEventValueChanged.

[sw addTarget:self action:@selector(touched:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];

- (void) timerFired: (NSTimer*) theTimer
{
    // set the value according to some external state. For the example just leave it.
    BOOL oldOn = sw.on;
    BOOL newOn = YES;

    [sw setOn:newOn];

    if(newOn != oldOn) {
        for(id target in [sw allTargets]) {
            for(NSString *action in [sw actionsForTarget:target forControlEvent:UIControlEventValueChanged]) {
                [target performSelector:NSSelectorFromString(action) withObject:self];
            }
        }
    }
}

EDIT2: I [original poster] just saw the new code in your answer and tried it out. I am not sure it is doing exactly what I want. However, I am not sure if I understand it correctly. I don't want to do exactly the same thing in both cases.

  1. Q: When the user touches the switch I want to toggle the boolean value in the model. I not necessarily need to change the switch programmatically because it is done automatically by touching it anyway. I want to count the touches to make sure none are lost.

A: Well, that's not really possible. However, you can certainly add a counter to the action method and see if the taps you make equal the counter. When the user taps the switch, then "sender == theSwitch". If you send the action method otherwise, you can use a different sender (to differentiate them).

  1. If I get the timer event in my minimal example I just want to leave the boolean value like it currently is. However, I need to set the switch state programmatically so that the view reflects the correct model state. – Bernhard Pieber 3 mins ago

Thats fine - but you keep saying you want the action method called. This code does that. If you misstated that, and you don't want the action method called, then delete the "if" block.

- (void)insureValueIs:(BOOL)val
{
    BOOL oldVal = sw.on;
    if(val != oldVal) {
        for(id target in [sw allTargets]) {
            for(NSString *action in [sw actionsForTarget:target forControlEvent:UIControlEventValueChanged]) {
                [target performSelector:NSSelectorFromString(action) withObject:self];
            }
        }
    }
}

Of course, I do want to achieve the same thing: That the model state is correctly reflected in the view. Does that make sense?

Frankly, you have not done a good job in describing EXACTLY what you want, and I keep responding to your comments, but even now I am still not totally clear. I believe you have all the information you need here to do whatever it is you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I know that the action is not triggered when I set the on property programmatically. That is not what I want. The problem is that the touchUpInside: is not called although the user has touched the switch. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 19:32
    
Touching a switch is equivalent to changing its value. It its absolutely critical that you get touches, then I suggest you add a transparent view over the switch, when you get a touchup event that you pass it to the switch and also trigger some method. – David H Aug 22 '12 at 21:56
    
Thanks! I will try that. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 22:14
    
I just saw the new code in your answer and tried it out. I am not sure it is doing exactly what I want. However, I am not sure if I understand it correctly. I don't want to do exactly the same thing in both cases. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 22:52
    
1. When the user touches the switch I want to toggle the boolean value in the model. I not necessarily need to change the switch programmatically because it is done automatically by toching it anyway. I want to count the touches to make sure none are lost. – Bernhard Pieber Aug 22 '12 at 22:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My original code works as expected in iOS 7. So it seems to have been a bug in iOS 6.

share|improve this answer

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