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CoffeeScript Source

return sprite: myFunc
  width: 79
  height: 66
throw:
  from: {}
  last: {}

Compiled With CoffeeScript 1.1.1

return {
  sprite: myFunc({
    width: 79,
    height: 66
  }),
  "throw": {
    from: {},
    last: {}
  }
};

Compiled With CoffeeScript 1.3.3

return {
  sprite: myFunc({
    width: 79,
    height: 66
  })
};

({
  "throw": {
    from: {},
    last: {}
  }
});

This breaks my code. I can see nothing in the changelog between versions. Is this a bug?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd call it a bug but the bug was in 1.1.1 and in your code for depending on a particular interpretation of ambiguous code. This:

return sprite: myFunc
  width: 79
  height: 66
throw:
  from: {}
  last: {}

may be a little ambiguous as to what block throw is supposed to be in but the 1.3.3 interpretation is the only one that makes sense to me: your indentation doesn't match your intent.

If we add a function wrapper for clarity:

f = ->
  return sprite: myFunc
    width: 79
    height: 66
  throw:
    from: {}
    last: {}

then what little ambiguity was there vanishes and the 1.3.3 interpretation:

f = ->
  return { sprite: myFunc(width: 79, height: 66) }
  { throw: { from: {}, last: {} } }

makes perfect sense as your structure is just a variation on:

f = ->
  return pancakes
  eggs

Just because braces and parentheses and what not are optional doesn't mean that they are forbidden. If the intent of a piece of code structure isn't obvious at a glance then you should force the structure with some braces and parentheses, something like this perhaps:

return { sprite: myFunc
  width: 79
  height: 66
throw:
  from: {}
  last: {}
}

or better (IMO):

return {
  sprite: myFunc(
    width: 79
    height: 66
  )
  throw:
    from: {}
    last: {}
}

Unfortunately, you're going to have to read all your CoffeeScript and add braces as needed. I hope you have a very good test suite.


Interestingly enough, if you drop the return:

sprite: myFunc
  width: 79
  height: 66
throw:
  from: {}
  last: {}

then you get this interpretation in the latest:

{
  sprite: myFunc(...)
  throw:  { from: ... }
}

That makes perfect sense to me as it looks like:

v =
  sprite: myFunc ...
  throw: ...

Your explicit return introduces context that isn't present when the return is implied.

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1  
This is a very thorough answer, especially since you notice the changed context when return is introduced. I believe the whitespace has not been fully thought out in coffeescript, and adding brackets seems like the wrong answer to me, as one of the key aspects to coffeescript's readability, and ease of editing, is not having to match up brackets. –  Billy Moon Aug 23 '12 at 12:59
    
@BillyMoon: I'd have to disagree about the connection between no-brackets and readability, especially with the amount of nesting that occurs in (Coffee|Java)Script code with callbacks and such. I tend to use braces and parentheses liberally precisely to make the code structure easier to understand at a glance; I also use a lot of single-use methods just to avoid the visual confusion of too much nesting. But we're not eight years old so we can leave that fight alone :) –  mu is too short Aug 23 '12 at 17:59
    
the bigger issue is that if I wrote code that works in coffeescript now, it might not if I update the coffeescript version - that is a critical issue for me. –  Billy Moon Aug 23 '12 at 18:49
1  
I hear you on that issue and how it relates to "the whitespace has not been fully thought out". There is no formal specification committee behind CoffeeScript so we get to find these issues in the field rather than through 10 years of the committee meat grinder. Ideally the CoffeeScript compiler would have a "lint" mode that would complain about ambiguous constructs. If a language/library/... favors backwards compatibility, you end up with a big mess; if it doesn't, you end up with a different sort of big mess. –  mu is too short Aug 23 '12 at 19:30
1  
@BillyMoon: I wish I had something better to say about this. The bleeding edge tends to involve a bit of pain and suffering. –  mu is too short Aug 23 '12 at 19:58
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