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I have two interfaces, one that contains a list of the other, and I want to have a class that implements the first interface but has a list of another class that implements the second interface instead of just a list of the interface. Example:

namespace TestInheritance
{
    public interface IBookShelf
    {
        long Stuff { get; set; }
        List<IBook> Books { get; set; }
    }
    public interface IBook
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public class BookShelf : IBookShelf
    {
        public long Stuff { get; set; }
        public List<Book> Books { get; set; }
    }
    public class Book : IBook
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

Obviously it doesn't like this. Is there a correct way to do what I'm trying to do, or do I just have to make BookShelf have a List<IBook> and cast each IBook to a Book when I want to use it? Looking for a pattern that could help me out here. Thanks.

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Fyi You implement an interface, not inherit it. –  asawyer Aug 22 '12 at 20:50
1  
…unless you are another interface –  Jay Aug 22 '12 at 20:55
    
@Jay Well, you've got me there. –  asawyer Aug 22 '12 at 20:55
    
@asawyer good call. I got it right in the question though! –  Biojayc Aug 22 '12 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

You can make IBookShelf generic where you constrain the generic argument to IBook

Then you can have:

public interface IBookShelf<T> where T : IBook
{
    long Stuff { get; set; }
    List<T> Books { get; set; }
}

public class BookShelf : IBookShelf<Book>
{
    public long Stuff { get; set; }
    public List<Book> Books { get; set; }
} 
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This is spot on (and the first answer to show this solution). –  Jay Aug 22 '12 at 20:52
    
@Jay yes and it's so close to what I'm looking for. What I really need is to be able to reference the IBookShelf's Books list as a List<IBook> in one place, and as a List<Book> in another. Does that make sense? –  Biojayc Aug 22 '12 at 21:07
    
@Biojayc I think if you need List<IBook> and List<Book> you have to cast either with your solution or with my solution in one of the cases. Can you add some usage examples to your question to make your question more clearer? –  nemesv Aug 22 '12 at 21:13

It's not clear exactly what you are trying to do - and I suspect it's not even clear to you. Why do you particularly want BookShelf.Books to be a List<Book>? Why is it restricting itself to only include Book values rather than IBook values? I suggest you consider what you'd want to happen in this situation:

public class EvilBook : IBook
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

IBookShelf bookShelf = new BookShelf() { Books = new List<Book>() };
bookShelf.Books.Add(new EvilBook());

Nothing in that code is suspicious1, with the interfaces you've given - but it ends up adding an EvilBook into a List<Book>, which surely isn't right. I often find that if the compiler's stopping me from doing something, it's useful to think about what problems I might run into if it had let me go ahead with my bad idea.

You might want to consider making IBookShelf generic:

public interface IBookShelf<T> where T : IBook
{
    long Stuff { get; set; }
    List<T> Books { get; set; }
}

Then:

public class BookShelf : IBookShelf<Book>

... but it really depends on what you're trying to achieve.

You might also want to ask yourself whether you really need the IBook interface in the first place... and also whether you really want a public writable property for Books.


1 In terms the compiler would recognize, anyway :)

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3  
"Nothing in that code is suspicious" I personally consider any class name prefixed with "Evil" suspicious. I guess I'm oversensitive though. –  Servy Aug 22 '12 at 20:54
    
@Servy: Footnote duly added :) –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '12 at 20:56

How about something like this:

namespace TestInheritance
{
    public interface IBookShelf <TBook> where TBook : IBook
    {
        long Stuff { get; set; }
        List<TBook> Books { get; set; }
    }
    public interface IBook
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public class BookShelf : IBookShelf<Book>
    {
        public long Stuff { get; set; }
        public List<Book> Books { get; set; }
    }
    public class Book : IBook
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is so close to the solution I want. What I need is for me to in one place be able to only use the IBookShelf and IBook interfaces to reference the collection, but in another use BookShelf and Book. Does this make sense? –  Biojayc Aug 22 '12 at 21:00

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