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I have this code that creates a task:

 Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                        {
                            ExtractStuff(fileName);
                        });

Sometimes I need to pause for few seconds inside ExtractStuff

Is it OK to use the regular Thread.Sleep(1000)? Or is there another way to pause the running task?

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When you say, is it OK to use Thread.Sleep(), what do you mean by that? –  Saher Aug 22 '12 at 20:58
    
Is the pause needed for some other thread to pickup some work? –  Saher Aug 22 '12 at 20:58
    
I mean will it pause the task only, or will it pause the parent thread. –  user1615362 Aug 22 '12 at 21:06
1  
Just the task. If you can make ExtractRecords async, you could do await Task.Delay to avoid wasting a thread during the sleep :) –  James Manning Aug 22 '12 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe it is fine to do this but preferable to use TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning.

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                    {
                        ExtractStuff(fileName);
                    },TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
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1  
I don't understand how this is related to the question? –  James Manning Aug 22 '12 at 21:53
4  
@James, this hints to the task scheduler that your Task may take a while to execute and therefore it should avoid tying up a limited resource (like the thread pool) with your Task. This may incur some additional overhead (from allocating a new thread rather than using a thread in the pool) but it may prevent other problems (multiple tasks taking up the pool and promptly sleeping, preventing other tasks from starting.) The takeaway is that if you plan to Sleep in your Task, you probably should consider yourself long-running. –  Dan Bryant Aug 22 '12 at 21:55

Thread.Sleep will block the thread running the Task (which is not ideal), but it can be an acceptable compromise (low risk and not a huge problem to performance) as long as you're not running a large number of tasks in parallel. .NET 4.5 has some improvements with 'async/await' and Task.Delay that will implicitly set up a continuation based on a timer (which doesn't require blocking a running thread), but this is not directly available in 4.0.

You can do the same thing yourself with something like this (not tested much, so use with caution):

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fullAction = RunActionsWithDelay(DoSomething, 2000, DoSomethingElse);
        fullAction.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine("Done");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static Task RunActionsWithDelay(Action first, int delay, Action second)
    {
        var delayedCompletion = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
        var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomething);
        task.ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            if (t.IsFaulted)
            {
                delayedCompletion.SetException(t.Exception);
            }
            else
            {
                Timer timer = null;
                timer = new Timer(s =>
                {
                    try
                    {
                        DoSomethingElse();
                        delayedCompletion.SetResult(null);
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        delayedCompletion.SetException(ex);
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        timer.Dispose();
                    }
                }, null, delay, Timeout.Infinite);                    
            }

        });
        return delayedCompletion.Task;
    }

    static void DoSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Something");
    }

    static void DoSomethingElse()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Something Else");
    }
}

This is fairly ugly, though you can encapsulate it a bit better than the above. It does eliminate the 'hanging' thread, but there is additional performance overhead associated with setting up the continuations. I really only recommend doing this if you have a lot of parallel tasks running and they all need to introduce delays.

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You say that Thread.Sleep will block the thread running the Task, but if I use LongRunning, wouldn't this result in only the task being paused and not the thread running the Task? –  user1615362 Aug 23 '12 at 0:11
    
+1, and thanks for expanding my answer, should have came back to it. –  Paul McCowat Aug 23 '12 at 8:19
    
@user1615362 Thread.Sleep() always blocks the current thread. If you use LongRunning, it won't be a thread from the ThreadPool, but it will still be some thread, so it's still wasteful. –  svick Aug 23 '12 at 12:47
    
@svick Your answer is complete nonsense. "but it will still be some thread" Of course it will be some thread, it will be the thread that I want to pause. –  user1615362 Aug 23 '12 at 16:59
    
@user1615362 In that case, I really don't understand the question in your first comment. You first say that you expect that a thread won't be blocked by Sleep() and then you say that of course it will be blocked? –  svick Aug 23 '12 at 17:42

If you need to delay the execution of ExtractStuff you can take a look at ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject and combine with an WaitHandle that is never set.

private static WaitHandle NeverSet = new WaitHandle();
private void ExtractStuff(object state)
{
    string filename = state as string;
    ....
}

private void StartExtract(string filename);
{
    ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject(NeverSet, ExtractStuff, fileName, seconds * 1000, true);
}

Hope that this will help you in your quest.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I don't need to delay the execution of ExtractStuff. I need to pause the execution of ExtractStuff in the middle based on internal logic. –  user1615362 Aug 22 '12 at 21:14

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