Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to figure out the smallest unsigned integral type that can represent a particular number, in compile time. Something like this...

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
template<size_t Bits>
struct uint_least{};

template<>
struct uint_least<8>{ typedef std::uint8_t type; };

template<>
struct uint_least<16>{ typedef std::uint16_t type; };

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
template<size_t max>
struct uint_least_bits
{
    static const size_t value = 14; // just a placeholder
};

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
template<size_t max>
class A
{
    typedef typename uint_least<uint_least_bits<max>::value>::type underlying_type;

    underlying_type m_X;
};

uint_least is meant to give you the smallest unsigned integral type that is at least Bits large and it should work for any value up to 64 (not just 8, 16, 32, 64 but also 1, 4, 13, etc).

uint_least_bits is meant to give you the minimum number of bits needed to represent max.

  • How can I implement uint_least?
  • How can I implement uint_least_bits?
  • What types should bits, min, and max be? If the answer is a template type, how can I guard against invalid input?

The exact structuring of the traits doesn't matter. Feel free to scrap what I provided. I just need to provide a number and get back the smallest unsigned integral type that can hold it.

share|improve this question
    
You could just use decltype on your integral constant. –  Kerrek SB Aug 22 '12 at 23:22
4  
Should int_least_bits<255, 256>::value be 1 or 9? –  GManNickG Aug 22 '12 at 23:22
    
@GManNickG Good question. I would say 9, however feel free to disagree and tell me why –  Dave Aug 22 '12 at 23:34
    
@Dave: Because I can encode two integer values in just one bit, zero meaning the first, one meaning the second. Basically, is this: "what type can I use to encode the values in this" or "what type can I use that would allow me to directly assign it the literal values in this range"? The word "represent" in your question is what introduces this ambiguity. –  GManNickG Aug 22 '12 at 23:42
1  
@KerrekSB: decltype won't give you the smallest type for values small enough to promote to int. For example, decltype(1) is int, not one of the char types. –  Keith Thompson Aug 23 '12 at 0:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I did this just yesterday, what a coincidence. I'll leave it here, even though it's not exactly what you need(it fixes the best integral type thing anyway):

#include <type_traits>
#include <stdint.h>

template<size_t i>
struct best_type {
    typedef typename std::conditional<
        (i <= 8),
        uint8_t,
        typename std::conditional<
            (i <= 16),
            uint16_t,
            typename std::conditional<
                (i <= 32),
                uint32_t,
                uint64_t
            >::type
        >::type
    >::type type;
};

Then, you'd use it like this:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>

template<size_t i>
struct best_type {
    typedef typename std::conditional<
        (i <= 8),
        uint8_t,
        typename std::conditional<
            (i <= 16),
            uint16_t,
            typename std::conditional<
                (i <= 32),
                uint32_t,
                uint64_t
            >::type
        >::type
    >::type type;
};   

int main() {
    std::cout << sizeof(best_type<2>::type) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(best_type<8>::type) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(best_type<15>::type) << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(best_type<17>::type) << std::endl;
}

Live demo, here.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 But I should get credit for using constexpr when the OP least expected it. :-) –  Howard Hinnant Aug 23 '12 at 0:17

If you've got constexpr, this will work:

#include <climits>
#include <cstdint>
#include <cstddef>

inline
constexpr
unsigned
clz(unsigned x)
{
    return x == 0 ? sizeof(x)*CHAR_BIT : x & 0x80000000 ? 0 : 1 + clz(x << 1);
}

inline
constexpr
unsigned
clp2(unsigned x)
{
    return x == 0 ? 0 : 1 << (sizeof(x)*CHAR_BIT - clz(x-1));
}

inline
constexpr
unsigned
at_least8(unsigned x)
{
    return x < 8 ? 8 : x;
}

template<size_t Bits>
struct uint_least{};

template<>
struct uint_least<8>{ typedef std::uint8_t type; };

template<>
struct uint_least<16>{ typedef std::uint16_t type; };

template<>
struct uint_least<32>{ typedef std::uint32_t type; };

template<>
struct uint_least<64>{ typedef std::uint64_t type; };

template<size_t max>
struct uint_least_bits
{
    static const size_t value = clp2(max);
};

template<size_t max>
class A
{
    typedef typename uint_least<at_least8(uint_least_bits<max>::value)>::type underlying_type;

    underlying_type m_X;
};

int main()
{
    A<3> a;
}

If you don't have constexpr, you could translate clp2 into a template meta-function (and that's left as an exercise for the reader :-)).

Oh, disclaimer: Assumes a 32 bit unsigned. That could be generalized too if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Tell me if I'm wrong, but I think it's useless to precise inline when defining constexpr functions. –  Morwenn Aug 23 '12 at 8:19
    
constexpr functions can still run at run time if called with non-constexpr arguments. –  Howard Hinnant Aug 23 '12 at 14:04
    
From the C++11 standard, section 7.1.5: constexpr functions and constexpr constructors are implicitly inline. Ok, that has nothing to do with the current problem. At least I've an answer for one question. Sorry for the trouble. –  Morwenn Aug 23 '12 at 15:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.