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I've been toying around with Boost's futures and was wondering if they were an acceptable and safe way to check if an individual thread has completed.

I had never used them before so most of the code I wrote was based off of Boost's Synchronization documentation.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/future.hpp>

int calculate_the_answer_to_life_the_universe_and_everything()
{
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(10));
    return 42;
}

int main()
{
    boost::packaged_task<int> task(calculate_the_answer_to_life_the_universe_and_everything);
    boost::unique_future<int> f(task.get_future());

    boost::thread th(boost::move(task));

    while(!f.is_ready())
    {
        std::cout << "waiting!" << std::endl;
        boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(1));
    }

    std::cout << f.get() << std::endl;

    th.join();
}

This appears to wait for the calculate_the_answer_to_life_the_universe_and_everything() thread to return 42. Could something possibly go wrong with this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Well, you can check whether the future's result is ready. The thread that produces the result doesn't necessarily have to have terminated, I suppose. –  Kerrek SB Aug 23 '12 at 0:28
    
Certainly, busy-waiting with a sleep is not the right thing to do. You probably wrote this as demo-code, though. –  usr Aug 23 '12 at 12:08

2 Answers 2

Yes, futures are safe to use in that way, and the code is (at a quick glance) safe and correct.

There are other ways to do the same thing (e.g. using an atomic_flag, or mutex-protected data, or many others) but your code is a valid way to do it.

N.B. instead of f.is_ready() and this_thread::sleep(seconds(1)) you could use f.wait_for(seconds(1)), which would wake as soon as the result is made ready. That waits directly on the future, instead of checking the future, then waiting using a separate mechanism, then checking, then waiting with a separate mechanism etc.

And instead of packaged_task and thread you could use async.

Using C++11 names instead of boost ...

int main()
{
    auto f =  std::async(std::launch::async, calculate_the_answer_to_life_the_universe_and_everything);

    while(f.wait_for(std::chrono::seconds(1)) == std::future_status::timeout)
        std::cout << "waiting!" << std::endl;

    std::cout << f.get() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

I've been toying around with Boost's futures and was wondering if they were an acceptable and safe way to check if an individual thread has completed.

Futures are a mechanism for asynchronous evaluation, not a synchronization mechanism. Although some of the primitives do have synchronization properties (future<>::get), the library is not designed to synchronize, but rather to fire a task and ignore it until the result is needed.

share|improve this answer
2  
I disagree, futures are designed to synchronize. Running a task in another thread is easy, safely synchronising the provider of a result with an execution agent waiting for that result is harder, and an important part of the futures library. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 23 '12 at 0:40
    
@JonathanWakely: I might not have been clear enough. The goal of the library is not synchronization but asynchronous execution of tasks. The asynchronous execution of tasks requires synchronization (to read the result), but futures were not designed to synchronize. While you can abuse futures for that for example by creating a future<bool> where the value will be set when the thread completes, and that is a use case whose sole purpose is synchronization, future is not the best tool for that. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 23 '12 at 0:46
    
It depends what you mean by "the library" and "futures". std::future and std::shared_future are designed to synchronise (but future<void> does a better job than future<bool> for simply knowing if something completed.) std::async is designed to execute tasks. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 23 '12 at 0:48
    
@JonathanWakely: If you think that future<> is the tool to use to check whether a thread has completed, then we don't agree, but you are very welcome to add an answer to that respect. I might be wrong (I have been multiple times in the past, and I will surely be wrong in the future again) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 23 '12 at 0:51
    
It's certainly not the tool, condition variables or simply a flag (either atomic or protected by a mutex) work fine too, but futures are another option. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 23 '12 at 0:53

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