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I need an array to be public (accessible to other methods in the class) but the array needs an input value "T" to create it. How do I instantiate a "global" variable that requires user input?

My code is as follows:

public class PercolationStats {
    **private double myarray[];**
    public PercolationStats(int N, int T) {
        **double myarray = new double[T];**
        for (i=0;i<T;i++) {
            Percolation percExperiment as new Percolation(N);
            //do more stuff, make calls to percExperiment.publicmethods
            myarray[i] = percExperiment.returnvalue;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int N = StdIn.readInt();
        int T = StdIn.readInt();
        PercolationStats percstats = new PercolationStats(N, T);
        //do more stuff, including finding mean and stddev of myarray[]
        StdOut.println(output);
    }

Another example in pseudocode:

class PercolationStats {
    Constructor(N, T) {
        new Percolation(N) //x"T" times
    }
    Main {
        new PercolationStats(N, T) //call constructor
    }
}
class Percolation {
    Constructor(N) {
        **new WQF(N)** //another class that creates an array with size dependent on N
    }
    Main {
        **make calls to WQF.publicmethods**
    }
}

In the second example, it seems to me that I need to have the new instance of class WQF made in the constructor of the Percolation in order to accept the parameter N. However, WQF would not be accessible to the Main method of Percolation. Help!

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1  
I'd recommend using proper naming conventions for variables. At a glance, people are going to think you're talking generics with T etc. getting thrown around. –  Paul Bellora Aug 23 '12 at 1:16
    
Your second example is extremely confusing. Why do you have two main methods? –  Ted Hopp Aug 23 '12 at 1:21
    
Percolation percExperiment as new Percolation(N) - is this even Java? –  Paul Bellora Aug 23 '12 at 1:23

2 Answers 2

Don't include the type declaration in your constructor. You are creating a local variable that masks the field. It should look like this:

public class PercolationStats {
    public double myarray[];
    public PercolationStats(int n, int y) {
        myarray = new double[t];
        for (i=0; i<t; i++) {
            Percolation percExperiment = new Percolation(n);
            //do more stuff, make calls to percExperiment.publicmethods
            myarray[i] = percExperiment.returnvalue;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int n = StdIn.readInt();
        int t = StdIn.readInt();
        PercolationStats percstats = new PercolationStats(n, t);
        //do more stuff, including finding mean and stddev of myarray[]
        StdOut.println(output);
    }
}

There's certainly no problem using a variable as the length when creating a new array.

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Tedd Hopp's answer corrects the bug in your code.

I'd just like to point out that myarray is NOT a global variable.

  1. Java doesn't have global variables,
  2. the closest it has is static variables, and
  3. myarray isn't one of those either. It is an instance variable, as you have declared it.

(And an instance variable is the right way to implement this ... IMO)

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