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I have two different classes that have the same class as a private field. This private field needs to be passed from one class to the other (or accessed in the other class), but I'm not sure how.

Here's an example of what I am trying to do:

public class RealVector() {

    private double[] components;

     // Other fields and methods in here

    public double distance(RealVector vec) {
        // Some code in here
    }
}

public class Observation() {

    private RealVector attributes;

    // Other fields and methods in here
}

public class Neuron() {

    private RealVector weight;

    // Other fields and methods in here   

    public double distance(Observation obs) {
        return weight.distance(obs.attributes); // This is what I want to do, but it won't work, since attributes is private
    }   
}

For the distance method of RealVector to work it needs a RealVector passed to it, but the distance method of Neuron only has an Observation passed to it, which contains a vector as a private field. I can think of a couple of workarounds, but I don't really like them.

1) Make Observation and Neuron extend the RealVector class. Then I wouldn't even have to write a distance function since it would just use the superclass (RealVector) distance method. I don't really like this solution since Observation and Neuron have a "has a" relation with the RealVector class and not an "is a" relation.

2) Have a method in the Observation class that returns the RealVector.

public RealVector getAttributes() {
    return attributes;
}  

I don't like this solution, since it defeats the purpose of having the RealVector field private. I might as well make attributes public in this case.

I could have it return a (deep) copy of the RealVector in the class. This approach seems inefficient, since I would have to make a copy of the RealVector (essentially copy an array) every time I call getAttributes().

3) Use interfaces. Haven't done much with interfaces, so I'm not too sure if they would be appropriate here.

Does anyone know of a way that I can keep attributes as a private member of Observation and accomplish what I'm looking to do in the distance method of Neuron?

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2  
have you heard of getters and setters? Create public getter and use it. –  SiB Aug 23 '12 at 2:38
1  
@Luiggi Mendoza - just did that. –  COM Aug 23 '12 at 3:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your Observer class has a distance method which takes in a RealVector then you don't need to expose the private RealVector attributes.

public class Observation {

    private RealVector attributes;

    public double distance(RealVector weight){
        return weight.distance(attributes);
    }
}

public class Neuron {

    private RealVector weight;

    public double distance(Observation obs) {
        return obs.distance(weight);
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Clever and simple solution, I wasn't even thinking along these lines. –  COM Aug 23 '12 at 3:00
    
This works great for the distance method, because it makes sense in my program to also have the distance you described as part of the observation class. However, there are some other methods that really should part of either only the Neuron class or only the Observation class. In this case a solution like this may not be appropriate or easy to implement. –  COM Aug 23 '12 at 14:49
    
The most common solution is to use getters as the others have answered. If you are worried about them being public you could put all the relevant classes into the same package and use package visibility stackoverflow.com/questions/403583/… –  Glitch Aug 23 '12 at 21:33

The standard way of doing this is to keep the fields private and create public getXXX() and setXXX() methods.

About

I don't like this solution, since it defeats the purpose of having the RealVector field private. I might as well make attributes public in this case.

You should understand that exposing just public getter doesn't compromise the private attribute of the field and one attribute will be truly private only if it is not required to be accessed into any other class.

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That's not strictly true; if a class's inner workings depend on the state of the exposed object providing a reference value to it can lead to problems. This is why getters often expose a copy or immutable-decorated version. –  Dave Newton Aug 23 '12 at 2:42
    
Unless I made a (deep) copy of the RealVector in the getter, it would be returning a reference to a RealVector, thus fully exposing this field. If the private field were a primitive type, it would be a different case. –  COM Aug 23 '12 at 3:33

One possible way would be to introduce getter/setter methods for the private variables of your class. So for example, for your Observation class, you can modify it as follows:

public class Observation() {

    private RealVector attributes;

    public RealVector getAttributes(){
        return attributes;
    }

    public RealVector setAttributes(RealVector attributes){
        this.attributes = attributes;
    }

    // Other fields and methods in here
}

EDIT Your question has the following comment about getter/setters that I missed:

I don't like this solution, since it defeats the purpose of having the RealVector field private. I might as well make attributes public in this case.

If you really do not want to expose the RealVector vector field, I think what you can do is have getter/setter methods for individual attributes of your RealVector class. In this way, you can control what you want to expose from your Observation class.

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Yes, accessing the individual elements of the RealVectors is definitely a possiblity, but this kind of defeats the purpose of using the RealVector class methods. –  COM Aug 23 '12 at 2:59

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