Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider This Class which overloads the = Operator for the Person Class. This works in VB.NET:

Public Class Person

    Public Sub New(ByVal FirstName As String, ByVal LastName As String)
        _FirstName = FirstName
        _LastName = LastName
    End Sub

    Private _LastName As String
    Public Property LastName() As String
        Get
            Return _LastName
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            _LastName = value
        End Set
    End Property

    Private _FirstName As String
    Public Property FirstName() As String
        Get
            Return _FirstName
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As String)
            _FirstName = value
        End Set
    End Property

    Public Shared Operator <>(ByVal Person1 As Person, ByVal Person2 As Person) As Boolean
        Return Not (Person1 = Person2)
    End Operator


    Public Shared Operator =(ByVal Person1 As Person, ByVal Person2 As Person) As Boolean
        Return Person1.FirstName = Person2.FirstName AndAlso Person1.LastName = Person2.LastName
    End Operator

    Public Class Test

        Public Sub TestIt()

            Dim P1 As New Person("f1", "l1")
            Dim P2 As Person = Nothing

            Dim IsEqual As Boolean = False

            If P1 IsNot Nothing AndAlso P2 IsNot Nothing Then

                If P1 = P2 Then
                    IsEqual = True
                End If

            End If

        End Sub
    End Class
End Class

And the same class in C#:

public Person(string FirstName, string LastName)
{
    _FirstName = FirstName;
    _LastName = LastName;
}

private string _LastName;
public string LastName
{
    get { return _LastName; }
    set { _LastName = value; }
}

private string _FirstName;
public string FirstName
{
    get { return _FirstName; }
    set { _FirstName = value; }
}

public static bool operator !=(Person Person1, Person Person2)
{
    return !(Person1 == Person2);
}


public static bool operator ==(Person Person1, Person Person2)
{
    return Person1.FirstName == Person2.FirstName && Person1.LastName == Person2.LastName;
}

public class Test
{
    public void TestIt()
    {
        Person P1 = new Person("f1", "l1");
        Person P2 = null;

        bool IsEqual = false;


        if (P1 != null && P2 != null)
        {
            if (P1 == P2)
            {
                IsEqual = true;
            }
        }
    }
}

Using the C# class, how can I test to see if a Person Object is null before calling the overloaded == operator function if the function is used in testing to see if it is null. That is, is there an equivalent counterpart function to VB's Is Nothing that is separate from the == test? It seems like C# uses == for both.

I tried object.IsEqual; that also looked wrong.

share|improve this question
    
The equivalent to VB.NET's "Is Nothing" is "== null" in C#. – StephenPAdams Aug 23 '12 at 3:14
    
@LookitsPuck: The point is that the == operator is overloaded for that type. VB.NET has separate overloads for = and Is. – Ryan O'Hara Aug 23 '12 at 3:15
    
Then you'll need to check what the reference is equal to. ReferenceEquals on the given object and compare to null. – StephenPAdams Aug 23 '12 at 3:15
    
@LookitsPuck Isn't the C# 'equivalent' of Is Nothing == default(Person)? Granted == null is correct for reference types.. but not for value types.. – Simon Whitehead Aug 23 '12 at 3:19
    
@SimonWhitehead, he's working with objects in this regard, no? That said, from MSDN on default: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xwth0h0d(v=vs.80).aspx FWIW, the default keyword wasn't available in all versions of .NET/VS. – StephenPAdams Aug 23 '12 at 3:24

BTW, since you're implementing == you should also override Equals (and GetHashCode).

A simple way to do this is to implement IEquatable<Person>:

public bool Equals(Person other)
{
    return other != null &&
           FirstName == other.FirstName &&
           LastName == other.LastName;
}

Then override Equals:

public override bool Equals(object o)
{
    var other = o as Person;
    return other != null && this.Equals(other);
}

Finally == is just:

public static bool operator ==(Person left, Person right)
{
    return object.Equals(left, right);
}

public static bool operator !=(Person left, Person right)
{
    return !(left == right);
}

(object.Equals hands null cases correctly.)

share|improve this answer
    
this.Equals(other) will intimate loop – Cole Johnson Aug 23 '12 at 3:46
    
@ColeJohnson: No, it will call the Equals(Person) overload – Porges Aug 23 '12 at 3:46
    
I accepted too fast. The check P2 != null yeilds the same Object reference not set to an instance of an object error. – ChadD Aug 24 '12 at 1:07
    
@Chad: can you explain your comment further? – Porges Aug 24 '12 at 2:22

Check for null in your overloaded operator too using object.ReferenceEquals:

public static bool operator ==(Person Person1, Person Person2)
{
    if(object.ReferenceEquals(Person1, null)) {
        return object.ReferenceEquals(Person2, null);
    } else if(object.ReferenceEquals(Person2, null)) {
        return false;
    } else {
        return Person1.FirstName == Person2.FirstName && Person1.LastName == Person2.LastName;
    }
}

Or, more concisely:

return object.ReferenceEquals(person1, person2) || (
           !object.ReferenceEquals(person1, null)
        && !object.ReferenceEquals(person2, null)
        && person1.FirstName == person2.FirstName
        && person1.LastName  == person2.LastName);
share|improve this answer
    
The first one works, the second is, ironically, StackOverflow without the .com. – ChadD Aug 24 '12 at 1:21
    
@Chad: Yeah, the != null thing. Change them to !object.ReferenceEquals(x, null). – Ryan O'Hara Aug 24 '12 at 4:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.