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Could anyone help me with the expected output of below given program. I tried to use SecurityManager but it throws SecurityException after displaying my out. Is there an y other way to handle it?

Rewrite the below program in such a way that it should print

Hi
Good Bye

NOTE: You cannot change the main method

Class Program{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        try{
            System.out.println("Hi");
            System.exit(0);
        }
        finally{
            System.out.println("Good Bye");
        }
    }
}   
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4 Answers 4

Look at the Runtime.addShutdownHook(Thread hook)

Example on how it's done...

public void attachShutDownHook(){
  Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread() {
   @Override
   public void run() {
    ...
   }
  });
}
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why dont just tackle with method and class names? please briefly scan my post, it has been quite a time since I've last coded in java.. Maybe I forgot about something, but this puzzle seems quite easy to break with most ordinary means. –  quetzalcoatl Sep 20 '12 at 12:19

I think that the SecurityManager approach is the right one ... if we view this as a puzzle. If you implement it correctly, you should get both the "Hi" and "Goodbye" messages.

You might be able to get rid of the stacktrace by installing your own default uncaught exception handler. Alternatively you could write an alternative entry point class that calls the Program.main() method and catches the security exception that is thrown when your custom security manager denies the call to System.exit().


(Of course, the real solution is to change the code so that System.exit() isn't called ... so that it is not necessary to hack around the call.)

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In theory, System.exit is signal JVM to stop and there can not be any further lines executed. There is no chance of JVM executing anything after it's process is done. But if you want to do some graceful shutdown activities, you can add the shutdown hooks. But you should not misunderstand that this is running after System.exit is executed. Running shutdown hooks and running finalizers (to reclaim the memory )is all part of JVM shutdown resulting from System.exit call.

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Is your task is to literaly written like that: "Rewrite the below program in such a way that it should print / NOTE: You cannot change the main method" ?

Theeen: [evil grin]

public class Program {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        System.out.println(“Hi”);
        System.out.println(“Good Bye”);
    }
}

class Program2 {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        try{
            System.out.println(“Hi”);
            System.exit(0);
        }
        finally{
            System.out.println(“Good Bye”);
        }
    }
}

just because noone said that I cannot change the class name :)

Or, if the class name must remain same, swap the class names and run Program2.main from the commandline instead, because noone said yo ucannot change the entry point :))

Another evil sample, more useful this time:

noone said you cannot tamper with other class names and packages:

// import NOTHING

package blargh; // note this!

class System {
    public static java.io.PrintStream out = java.lang.System.out;

    public static void exit(int ignored) { }
}

class Program {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        try{
            System.out.println(“Hi”);
            System.exit(0);
        }
        finally{
            System.out.println(“Good Bye”);
        }
    }
}

etc..

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note that I could have mistaken the static field initialization syntax with C#. if so - you have to use static constructor to initialize the 'out' field properly! –  quetzalcoatl Sep 20 '12 at 12:13

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