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I have a method in C#, which creates a JSON object of the user credentials. Below is the CS file.

public string CreateLoginjson(string strErrorType, bool blIsAuthenticated)
        {
            StringBuilder sbLoginJson = new StringBuilder();
            if (blIsAuthenticated)
            {
                sbLoginJson.Append("{LoginSuccess:1");
            }
            else
            {
                sbLoginJson.Append("{LoginSuccess:0");
            }

            if (strErrorType != string.Empty)
            {
                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "Token" ||
                      strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "BlankToken")
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber1:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber2:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber3:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber4:\"Error\"");

                }


                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "Password")
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtPassword:\"Error\"");

                }

                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "UserName")
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",UserName:\"Error\"");

                }
                string strLoadErrorControlMessage = LoadErrorControl(strErrorType,
                                                                      string.Empty);

                if (strLoadErrorControlMessage!= string.Empty)
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",ErrorMessage:
                                         '" + strLoadErrorControlMessage + "'");

                }

            }
            sbLoginJson.Append("}");

            var LoginJson = sbLoginJson.ToString();
            return LoginJson;

Now, I need to pass the LoginJson to a JS function that checks if incorrect credentials are provided, this function finds the control & adds an attribute to it JS

function GetLoginJson(strLoginJson) {
    if (strLoginJson != '' && strLoginJson != undefined) {
        var objLoginJson = strLoginJson;

        if (objLoginJson.LoginSuccess == "1") {

        }
        else if (objLoginJson.LoginSuccess == "0") {

            if (objLoginJson.txtUserName != '' 
                 && objLoginJson.txtUserName != undefined) 
            {
                $('#txtUserName').attr("class", objLoginJson.txtUserName);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtUserName').attr("class", "Input");
            }

            if (objLoginJson.txtPassword != '' 
                 && objLoginJson.txtPassword != undefined) 
            {
               $('#txtPassword').attr("class", objLoginJson.txtPassword);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtPassword').attr("class", "Input");
            }
            if (objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber1 != '' 
                  && objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber1 != undefined) 
            {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber1').attr("class", 
                                                objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber1);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber1').attr("class", "Error");
            }
            if (objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber2 != '' 
                  && objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber2 != undefined) 
            {
               $('#txtTestTokenNumber2').attr("class", 
                                               objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber2);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber2').attr("class", "Error");
            }

            if (objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber3 != '' && 
                 objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber3 != undefined) {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber3').attr("class", 
                                                objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber3);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber3').attr("class", "Error");
            }
            if (objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber4 != '' && 
                  objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber4 != undefined) {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber4').attr("class", 
                                                objLoginJson.txtTestTokenNumber4);
            }
            else 
            {
                $('#txtTestTokenNumber4').attr("class", "Error");
            }

            $('#ErrorControl').html('');

        }
    }
}

I want to pass the JSON variable from the CS to this jQuery statement `$('#ErrorControl').html('');'

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
When GetLoginJson method is called? on page load? –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid Aug 23 '12 at 4:55
    
No, not on Page load. This function gets called once the user provides all his credentials.. & if any of the credentials are missed by the user, the ErrorControl will be displayed.. –  user1502890 Aug 23 '12 at 4:58
    
I think I understand that you want to create an HTML representation of your JSON data. Is this what you meant? $('#ErrorControl').html("Error Message: " + objLoginJson.ErrorMessage); –  FilmJ Aug 23 '12 at 5:01
1  
why don't you use an ajax call. It would call a server side method and from that method you can return a json object –  Muhammad Adeel Zahid Aug 23 '12 at 5:01
    
@FilmJ : Yes, I want to create an HTML representation of the JSON data. However, if I add your line of code, I'm getting an undefined error. I think I need to add this line from my CS file .. sbLoginJson.Append(",ErrorMessage:'" + strLoadErrorControlMessage + "'"); Thanks –  user1502890 Aug 23 '12 at 5:07

4 Answers 4

If the user provides all the information and clicks something(any control), you can make an ajax request from jquery. If you are returning some error message from CS, you can use that message directly as

$('#ErrorControl').html(response.d)

d = "string which you retrun from CS".

where response is the parameter for your success function. d is the default property(variable) for the received object.

if you dont want to display string directly, use the returned data and call another javascript function.

Thanks

share|improve this answer
    
Guys: Thank you for your responses. The methods for the postback have already been written. I am able to create a JSON object as well. My question is, if the user clicks the Login button without filling in the credentials correctly, an Error message in the from of an HTML will be displayed, asking the user to provide the correct info. Now, the method that creates the JSON object of the user credentials returns a string, which I believe must be passed to the JS function, to the statement $('#ErrorControl').html(''); –  user1502890 Aug 23 '12 at 6:20
    
great, Thanks.. –  robot Aug 23 '12 at 7:10
    
u1502890, my post below gives an answer to the question posed - namely how to pass the returned JSON variable (actually a decoded JSON representation of an object or array) to a function. It also demonstrates how to call the "login" webservice with an ajax request. Exactly what you do with the properties of the decoded JSON in the success handler is maybe the subject of another question. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Aug 23 '12 at 11:46

First of all, you could try the JavaScriptSerializer (chekc the link) to serialize any object into JSON and then send a string response to the client.

For the communication between the server and the client you can use the jquery's ajax call which is calling your webservice (f.e.), or if you building an ASP.NET site or application then you can use PageMethods and calling it directly from javascript.

If you are intrested in the PageMethods option, here is a quite good and easy tutorial.

share|improve this answer

user1502890,

Server-side

I don't really know C# but it appears that you are trying to build a JSON string directly. It is far more normal (and easier and more reliable) to build an object and then to stringify it into JSON with either a built-in language command or a utility method. I guess this must be possible in C#.

Client-side

Assuming the credentials fields to be in a form with id="credentialsForm" and the server-side script to be requestable as the relative URL "myCredentialsChecker.xtn", then the jQuery will be something like this:

$(function() {
    function loginResponse(j) {
        j = j || {};
        if (j.LoginSuccess) {
            //...
        }
        else {
            $('#txtUserName').attr("class", j.txtUserName ? j.txtUserName : "Input");
            $('#txtPassword').attr("class", j.txtPassword ? j.txtPassword : "Input");
            $('#txtTestTokenNumber1').attr("class", j.txtTestTokenNumber1 ? j.txtTestTokenNumber1 : "Error");
            $('#txtTestTokenNumber2').attr("class", j.txtTestTokenNumber2 ? j.txtTestTokenNumber2 : "Error");
            $('#txtTestTokenNumber3').attr("class", j.txtTestTokenNumber3 ? j.txtTestTokenNumber3 : "Error");
            $('#txtTestTokenNumber4').attr("class", j.txtTestTokenNumber4 ? j.txtTestTokenNumber4 : "Error");
            $('#ErrorControl').html('');
        }
    }

    $("#credentialsForm").on('submit', function() {
        $.ajax({
            url: "myCredentialsChecker.xxx",
            data: $(this).serialize(),
            type: 'POST', // or 'GET'
            dataType: 'json',
            success: function(j) {
                loginResponse(j);
            ),
            error: function() {
                loginResponse();
            }
        });
        return false;
    });
});

Notes

  • Everything in the else{...} clause simplifies as above because '' and undefined are both falsy, so simply testing foo will do the job. The ternary alternaive to if(){...} else{...} also makes for compact code.

  • I'm not convinced that setting classes to the returned strings is the right thing to do but I've not changed this aspect.

share|improve this answer
    
Since you've factored out the success handler as a separate function, you could just as well just have success: loginResponse, ... and avoid some clutter. =) –  Tomas Lycken Aug 23 '12 at 6:24
    
@Tomas Lycken, yes, can but I just prefer the symmetry of the success and error handlers written in the same way. It's easier to see at a glance how they are subtly different. Readability over efficiency on this occasion. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Aug 23 '12 at 10:20
    
... and it's good to know there's someone out there checking this stuff :) –  Beetroot-Beetroot Aug 23 '12 at 10:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally wrote : CS file as

 public string CreateLoginjson(string strErrorType, bool blIsAuthenticated)
        {

            StringBuilder sbLoginJson = new StringBuilder();
            if (blIsAuthenticated)
            {
                sbLoginJson.Append("{LoginSuccess:1");
            }
            else
            {
                sbLoginJson.Append("{LoginSuccess:0");
            }

            if (strErrorType != string.Empty)
            {
                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "Token" || strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }).Split(new char[] { ',' }).Contains("BlankToken"))
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber1:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber2:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber3:\"Error\"");
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtTestTokenNumber4:\"Error\"");

                }


                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "Password" ||  strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }).Split(new char[] { ',' }).Contains("BlankPassword"))
                {
                    sbLoginJson.Append(",txtPassword:\"Error\"");

                }

                if (strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }) == "UserName" ||  strErrorType.TrimEnd(new char[] { ',' }).Split(new char[] { ',' }).Contains("BlankUserName"))
                {
                        sbLoginJson.Append(",txtUserName:\"Error\"");
                }

                    string strLoadErrorControlMessage = LoadErrorControl(strErrorType, string.Empty);

                    if (strLoadErrorControlMessage != string.Empty)
                    {
                        PageTestApplicationLogin objPageTestApplicationLogin = new PageTestApplicationLogin(objClientConfiguration);
                        sbLoginJson.Append(",ErrorMessage:'" + objPageTestApplicationLogin.GetTestApplicationLoginErrorHtml("", strLoadErrorControlMessage).Replace("'", "\"") + "'");

                    }

                sbLoginJson.Append("}");
            }
            var LoginJson = sbLoginJson.ToString();
            return LoginJson;

        }

JS file :

if (objLoginJson.ErrorMessage != '' && objLoginJson.ErrorMessage != undefined) {
                $('#ErrorControl').html(objLoginJson.ErrorMessage);
                $('#ErrorControl').find('#tblLoginError').css('display', 'block');
            }
            else {
                $('#ErrorControl').html("");
                $('#ErrorControl').find('#tblLoginError').css('display', 'none');
            }

        }

Thank you all for your Suggestions.. Cheers ....

share|improve this answer

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