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What I'm trying to do is speed up this query. Currently it's about 15+ seconds slow. There are indexes on both r.email and v.sent as well as r.id, r.viewed and r.saved. EXPLAIN is showing both keys are in use, however I'm seeing that it's using Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort.

Any ideas on improving this query?

SELECT r.id, r.top, r.email
FROM request as r
WHERE r.viewed = 0 AND r.saved = 0 AND r.email NOT IN ( 
    SELECT v.sent FROM viewing as v WHERE v.sent = r.email
)
GROUP BY r.email 
ORDER BY r.top desc, r.date
LIMIT 100;
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1  
That's a correlated sub-query, meaning it'll be evaluated for every row of r being considered. try re-writing as a normal join instead. –  Marc B Aug 23 '12 at 4:58
    
There is no reason for that WHERE condition on the subquery to be there. If you had removed that, MySQL would've optimized away the subquery as it's no longer dependent on the outer query. –  Dan Grossman Aug 23 '12 at 21:13
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4 Answers 4

MySQL uses a temporary table for multiple records in an IN clause. Try

SELECT r.id, r.top, r.email
FROM request as r
left outer join viewing v on v.sent = r.email
WHERE r.viewed = 0 AND r.saved = 0 AND v.sent is null
GROUP BY r.email 
ORDER BY r.top desc, r.date
LIMIT 100;
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Seems I'm only seeing 12 rows found yet there are thousands. Checked both r.viewed and r.saved = 0 in a select and there are thousands returned. Also checked the viewing table and most v.sent are empty. The field is set to not allow null. –  stwhite Aug 23 '12 at 5:30
    
That is odd. See this simplified example. Maybe you can enhance it. –  juergen d Aug 23 '12 at 6:27
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Use LEFT JOIN instead of NOT IN: why..? see here

SELECT r.id, r.top, r.email
FROM request as r
     LEFT JOIN viewing v
        ON r.email= v.sent
WHERE r.viewed = 0 AND 
      r.saved = 0 AND 
      v.sent IS NULL
GROUP BY r.email
ORDER BY r.top DESC, r.date
LIMIT 100;

For best performance, consider adding following indexes on tables, preferably covering indexes:

ALTER TABLE request ADD INDEX ix1 (email, viewed, saved, top, date);

ALTER TABLE viewing ADD INDEX ix1 (sent);
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See: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  Omesh Sep 14 '12 at 7:23
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SELECT
  r.id,
  r.top,
  r.email
FROM
  request r
LEFT OUTER JOIN
  viewing v
ON
  v.sent = r.email
WHERE
  r.viewed = 0
AND
  r.saved = 0
AND
  v.sent IS NULL
GROUP BY
  r.email
ORDER BY
  r.top DESC, r.date
LIMIT 100
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Apparently MySQL has subquery performance issues.

Luckily, there are ways to get around this. Specifically, transforming your subqueries into joins, or in your particular case into an exclusion join.

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