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Problem Description

Servlet-3.0 API allows to detach a request/response context and answer to it later.

However if I try to write a big amount of data, something like:

AsyncContext ac = getWaitingContext() ;
ServletOutputStream out = ac.getResponse().getOutputStream();
out.print(some_big_data);
out.flush()

It may actually block - and it does block in trivial test cases - for both Tomcat 7 and Jetty 8. The tutorials recommend to create a thread pool that would handle such a setup - witch is generally the counter-positive to a traditional 10K architecture.

However if I have 10,000 open connections and a thread pool of let's say 10 threads, it is enough for even 1% of clients that have low speed connections or just blocked connection to block the thread pool and completely block the comet response or slow it down significantly.

The expected practice is to get "write-ready" notification or I/O completion notification and than continue to push the data.

How can this be done using Servlet-3.0 API, i.e. how do I get either:

  • Asynchronous Completion notification on I/O operation.
  • Get non-blocking I/O with write ready notification.

If this is not supported by the Servlet-3.0 API, are there any Web Server specific APIs (like Jetty Continuation or Tomcat CometEvent) that allow to handle such events truly asynchronously without faking asynchronous I/O using thread pool.

Does anybody know?

And if this is not possible can you confirm it with a reference to documentation?

Problem demonstration in a sample code

I had attached the code below that emulates event-stream.

Notes:

  • it uses ServletOutputStream that throws IOException to detect disconnected clients
  • it sends keep-alive messages to make sure clients are still there
  • I created a thread pool to "emulate" asynchronous operations.

In such an example I explicitly defined thread pool of size 1 to show the problem:

  • Start an application
  • Run from two terminals curl http://localhost:8080/path/to/app (twice)
  • Now send the data with curd -d m=message http://localhost:8080/path/to/app
  • Both clients received the data
  • Now suspend one of the clients (Ctrl+Z) and send the message once again curd -d m=message http://localhost:8080/path/to/app
  • Observe that another non-suspended client either received nothing or after the message was transfered stopped receiving keep-alive requests because other thread is blocked.

I want to solve such a problem without using thread pool, because with 1000-5000 open connections I can exhaust the thread pool very fast.

The sample code below.


import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;

import javax.servlet.AsyncContext;
import javax.servlet.ServletConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.annotation.WebServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.ServletOutputStream;


@WebServlet(urlPatterns = "", asyncSupported = true)
public class HugeStreamWithThreads extends HttpServlet {

    private long id = 0;
    private String message = "";
    private final ThreadPoolExecutor pool = 
        new ThreadPoolExecutor(1, 1, 50000L,TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS,new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>());
        // it is explicitly small for demonstration purpose

    private final Thread timer = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run()
        {
            try {
                while(true) {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                    sendKeepAlive();
                }
            }
            catch(InterruptedException e) {
                // exit
            }
        }
    });


    class RunJob implements Runnable {
        volatile long lastUpdate = System.nanoTime();
        long id = 0;
        AsyncContext ac;
        RunJob(AsyncContext ac) 
        {
            this.ac = ac;
        }
        public void keepAlive()
        {
            if(System.nanoTime() - lastUpdate > 1000000000L)
                pool.submit(this);
        }
        String formatMessage(String msg)
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.append("id");
            sb.append(id);
            for(int i=0;i<100000;i++) {
                sb.append("data:");
                sb.append(msg);
                sb.append("\n");
            }
            sb.append("\n");
            return sb.toString();
        }
        public void run()
        {
            String message = null;
            synchronized(HugeStreamWithThreads.this) {
                if(this.id != HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id) {
                    this.id = HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id;
                    message = HugeStreamWithThreads.this.message;
                }
            }
            if(message == null)
                message = ":keep-alive\n\n";
            else
                message = formatMessage(message);

            if(!sendMessage(message))
                return;

            boolean once_again = false;
            synchronized(HugeStreamWithThreads.this) {
                if(this.id != HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id)
                    once_again = true;
            }
            if(once_again)
                pool.submit(this);

        }
        boolean sendMessage(String message) 
        {
            try {
                ServletOutputStream out = ac.getResponse().getOutputStream();
                out.print(message);
                out.flush();
                lastUpdate = System.nanoTime();
                return true;
            }
            catch(IOException e) {
                ac.complete();
                removeContext(this);
                return false;
            }
        }
    };

    private HashSet<RunJob> asyncContexts = new HashSet<RunJob>();

    @Override
    public void init(ServletConfig config) throws ServletException
    {
        super.init(config);
        timer.start();
    }
    @Override
    public void destroy()
    {
        for(;;){
            try {
                timer.interrupt();
                timer.join();
                break;
            }
            catch(InterruptedException e) {
                continue;
            }
        }
        pool.shutdown();
        super.destroy();
    }


    protected synchronized void removeContext(RunJob ac)
    {
        asyncContexts.remove(ac);
    }

    // GET method is used to establish a stream connection
    @Override
    protected synchronized void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
            throws ServletException, IOException {

        // Content-Type header
        response.setContentType("text/event-stream");
        response.setCharacterEncoding("utf-8");

        // Access-Control-Allow-Origin header
        response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");

        final AsyncContext ac = request.startAsync();

        ac.setTimeout(0);
        RunJob job = new RunJob(ac);
        asyncContexts.add(job);
        if(id!=0) {
            pool.submit(job);
        }
    }

    private synchronized void sendKeepAlive()
    {
        for(RunJob job : asyncContexts) {
            job.keepAlive();
        }
    }

    // POST method is used to communicate with the server
    @Override
    protected synchronized void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
            throws ServletException, IOException 
    {
        request.setCharacterEncoding("utf-8");
        id++;
        message = request.getParameter("m");        
        for(RunJob job : asyncContexts) {
            pool.submit(job);
        }
    }


}

The sample above uses threads to prevent blocking... However if the number of blocking clients is bigger than the size of the thread pool it would block.

How could it be implemented without blocking?

share|improve this question
    
I'm also strongly interested in an answer to this question. In general, it doesn't seem to be possible to get non-blocking access to the underlying channel, but with some caveats we can prevent a client from chewing up thread and causing too severe an impact on other clients. Ultimately, I'd love the portable servlets API to expose a way to do proper non-blocking writes, but I doubt that'll come anytime soon (they'd say "just write a bean/app" rather than use a servlet container). I think my solution basically works though for your/my more limited problem if your servlet container is friendly. –  Nicholas Wilson Apr 30 '13 at 23:53
    
You can see this technique as I've implemented it in a github project at github.com/NWilson/oidrelay. Any comments welcome! I started with Java on Saturday (heavy Haskell and C user) and I've only had a few evenings with it. –  Nicholas Wilson May 1 '13 at 19:51

6 Answers 6

I've found the Servlet 3.0 Asynchronous API tricky to implement correctly and helpful documentation to be sparse. After a lot of trial and error and trying many different approaches, I was able to find a robust solution that I've been very happy with. When I look at my code and compare it to yours, I notice one major difference that may help you with your particular problem. I use a ServletResponse to write the data and not a ServletOutputStream.

Here my go-to Asynchronous Servlet class adapted slightly for your some_big_data case:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

import javax.servlet.AsyncContext;
import javax.servlet.AsyncEvent;
import javax.servlet.AsyncListener;
import javax.servlet.ServletConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.annotation.WebInitParam;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpSession;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;

@javax.servlet.annotation.WebServlet(urlPatterns = { "/async" }, asyncSupported = true, initParams = { @WebInitParam(name = "threadpoolsize", value = "100") })
public class AsyncServlet extends HttpServlet {

  private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(AsyncServlet.class);

  public static final int CALLBACK_TIMEOUT = 10000; // ms

  /** executor service */
  private ExecutorService exec;

  @Override
  public void init(ServletConfig config) throws ServletException {

    super.init(config);
    int size = Integer.parseInt(getInitParameter("threadpoolsize"));
    exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(size);
  }

  @Override
  public void service(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse res) throws ServletException, IOException {

    final AsyncContext ctx = req.startAsync();
    final HttpSession session = req.getSession();

    // set the timeout
    ctx.setTimeout(CALLBACK_TIMEOUT);

    // attach listener to respond to lifecycle events of this AsyncContext
    ctx.addListener(new AsyncListener() {

      @Override
      public void onComplete(AsyncEvent event) throws IOException {

        logger.info("onComplete called");
      }

      @Override
      public void onTimeout(AsyncEvent event) throws IOException {

        logger.info("onTimeout called");
      }

      @Override
      public void onError(AsyncEvent event) throws IOException {

        logger.info("onError called: " + event.toString());
      }

      @Override
      public void onStartAsync(AsyncEvent event) throws IOException {

        logger.info("onStartAsync called");
      }
    });

    enqueLongRunningTask(ctx, session);
  }

  /**
   * if something goes wrong in the task, it simply causes timeout condition that causes the async context listener to be invoked (after the fact)
   * <p/>
   * if the {@link AsyncContext#getResponse()} is null, that means this context has already timed out (and context listener has been invoked).
   */
  private void enqueLongRunningTask(final AsyncContext ctx, final HttpSession session) {

    exec.execute(new Runnable() {

      @Override
      public void run() {

        String some_big_data = getSomeBigData();

        try {

          ServletResponse response = ctx.getResponse();
          if (response != null) {
            response.getWriter().write(some_big_data);
            ctx.complete();
          } else {
            throw new IllegalStateException(); // this is caught below
          }
        } catch (IllegalStateException ex) {
          logger.error("Request object from context is null! (nothing to worry about.)"); // just means the context was already timeout, timeout listener already called.
        } catch (Exception e) {
          logger.error("ERROR IN AsyncServlet", e);
        }
      }
    });
  }

  /** destroy the executor */
  @Override
  public void destroy() {

    exec.shutdown();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Several problems: (1) ctx.complete() closes the response and I actually want to reuse it to send more data later. (2) using response.getWriter() is not good because it does not throw an IOException so I can't know if for example the client had disconnected; see stackoverflow.com/questions/12039939/… ; (3) it seems that you are actually using a thread pool to "solve" the problem rather than making the response truly asynchronous. –  Artyom Aug 28 '12 at 11:53
2  
@Artyom From the perspective of the client, the response is indeed asynchronous. The client makes a request, and at some point in the future the server will respond. With the HTTP 1.1 standard, a connection is kept alive and reused for multiple requests, allowing for this asynchronous behavior. Calling ctx.complete() closes the response, but all you need to do is have the client request the data again directly after it receives the data the first time, if you even need it to. Also see: stackoverflow.com/questions/7124508/… –  herrtim Aug 28 '12 at 12:46
1  
What you are describing is long polling, but I'm talking about HTTP streaming and it is allowed. This is how Server-Sent Events are build: w3.org/TR/eventsource and this is what I want to build. Basically I don't close the connection but I rather continue to stream the data upon new events. i.e. I'm talking about server-side asynchronous response handling (not client side) –  Artyom Aug 28 '12 at 13:03
2  
@Artyom Agreed. What I've implemented is long polling using the Async feature specified in the Servlet 3.0 API. I doubt you can use it to achieve exactly what you are going for. Perhaps the new WebSocket implementation from Tomcat version 7.0.27 and higher is what you need: tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/web-socket-howto.html –  herrtim Aug 28 '12 at 13:38
1  
Giving bounty for an effort. Not because it is actually the answer. So I'm not accepting it. –  Artyom Sep 1 '12 at 8:49

We can't quite cause the writes to be asynchronous. We realistically have to live with the limitation that when we do write something out to a client, we expect to be able to do so promptly and are able to treat it as an error if we don't. That is, if our goal is to stream data to the client as fast as possible and use the blocking/non-blocking status of the channel as a way to control the flow, we're out of luck. But, if we're sending data at a low rate that a client should be able to handle, we are able at least to promptly disconnect clients that don't read quickly enough.

For example, in your application, we send the keepalives at a slow-ish rate (every few seconds) and expect clients to be able to keep up with all the events they're being sent. We splurge the data to the client, and if it can't keep up, we can disconnect it promptly and cleanly. That's a bit more limited than true asynchronous I/O, but it should meet your need (and incidentally, mine).

The trick is that all of the methods for writing out output which just throw IOExceptions actually do a bit more than that: in the implementation, all the calls to things that can be interrupt()ed will be wrapped with something like this (taken from Jetty 9):

catch (InterruptedException x)
    throw (IOException)new InterruptedIOException().initCause(x);

(I also note that this doesn't happen in Jetty 8, where an InterruptedException is logged and the blocking loop is immediately retried. Presumably you make to make sure your servlet container is well-behaved to use this trick.)

That is, when a slow client causes a writing thread to block, we simply force the write to be thrown up as an IOException by calling interrupt() on the thread. Think about it: the non-blocking code would consume a unit of time on one of our processing threads to execute anyway, so using blocking writes that are just aborted (after say one millisecond) is really identical in principle. We're still just chewing up a short amount of time on the thread, only marginally less efficiently.

I've modified your code so that the main timer thread runs a job to bound the time in each write just before we start the write, and the job is cancelled if the write completes quickly, which it should.

A final note: in a well-implemented servlet container, causing the I/O to throw out ought to be safe. It would be nice if we could catch the InterruptedIOException and try the write again later. Perhaps we'd like to give slow clients a subset of the events if they can't keep up with the full stream. As far as I can tell, in Jetty this isn't entirely safe. If a write throws, the internal state of the HttpResponse object might not be consistent enough to handle re-entering the write safely later. I expect it's not wise to try to push a servlet container in this way unless there are specific docs I've missed offering this guarantee. I think the idea is that a connection is designed to be shut down if an IOException happens.

Here's the code, with a modified version of RunJob::run() using a grotty simple illustration (in reality, we'd want to use the main timer thread here rather than spin up one per-write which is silly).

public void run()
{
    String message = null;
    synchronized(HugeStreamWithThreads.this) {
        if(this.id != HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id) {
            this.id = HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id;
            message = HugeStreamWithThreads.this.message;
        }
    }
    if(message == null)
        message = ":keep-alive\n\n";
    else
        message = formatMessage(message);

    final Thread curr = Thread.currentThread();
    Thread canceller = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run()
        {
            try {
                Thread.sleep(2000);
                curr.interrupt();
            }
            catch(InterruptedException e) {
                // exit
            }
        }
    });
    canceller.start();

    try {
        if(!sendMessage(message))
            return;
    } finally {
        canceller.interrupt();
        while (true) {
            try { canceller.join(); break; }
            catch (InterruptedException e) { }
        }
    }

    boolean once_again = false;
    synchronized(HugeStreamWithThreads.this) {
        if(this.id != HugeStreamWithThreads.this.id)
            once_again = true;
    }
    if(once_again)
        pool.submit(this);

}
share|improve this answer
    
To downvoter: thanks, any comments on why? I worked hard on this answer and for my own use would like to know if there's a better solution. If you think there's a better way please do share. –  Nicholas Wilson Jun 5 '13 at 14:55

Is Spring an option for you? Spring-MVC 3.2 has a class called DeferredResult, which will gracefully handle your "10,000 open connections/10 server pool threads" scenario.

Example: http://blog.springsource.org/2012/05/06/spring-mvc-3-2-preview-introducing-servlet-3-async-support/

share|improve this answer
    
(I've seen this link before, as many others) And how does it work asynchronously exactly? –  Artyom Aug 31 '12 at 13:40
2  
Client-side: either via WebSockets or long polling; server-side: the async DeferredResult will return after processing in a non-server-pool thread. Check out the spring-mvc-chat example git link; it's really concise and should be able to tell you if it's what you need in a short amount of time. –  JJ Zabkar Aug 31 '12 at 16:55

During my research on this topic, this thread kept popping up, so figured I mention it here:

Servlet 3.1 introduced async operations on ServletInputStream and ServletOutputStream. See ServletOutputStream.setWriteListener.

An example can be found at http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/7/tutorial/doc/servlets013.htm

share|improve this answer

I've had a quick look at your listing, so I may have missed some points. The advantage of a pool thread is to share thread resources between several tasks over time. Maybe you can solve your problem by spacing keepAlive responses of different http connections, instead of grouping all of them at the same time.

share|improve this answer

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