Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a code for finding least common ancestor of nodes in binary tree but it seems to return null instead of the LCA.

My algorithm is as below.

  1. Recursively find the ancestor in left and right branch of tree
  2. A node where left as well as right tree has matching elements in the LCA.

    public class LCA {
      public static BinaryTreeNode findLCA( BinaryTreeNode root, BinaryTreeNode node1 , BinaryTreeNode node2) {     
    
    if (root == null) {
        return null;
    }       
    
    BinaryTreeNode left = root.getLeft();
    BinaryTreeNode right = root.getRight(); 
    
    if (left != null && (left == node1 || left == node2)) {
        return root;                
    }
    
    if (right != null && (right == node1 || right == node2)) {
        return root;                
    }
    
    if (( findLCA(left, node1, node2) != null) && (findLCA(right, node1, node2) != null)) {         
        return root;
    }
    
    return null; }}
    

What could be the problem with this code?

share|improve this question
2  
but this is not working fine - What is the undesired behavior you are encountering? –  amit Aug 23 '12 at 6:26
    
@amit, this is not returning me the lca and instead returning null –  Manish Aug 23 '12 at 6:27
    
The algorithm is really inefficient. Try the following approach instead: From node1 and node2 collect the paths upwards in the tree to the root node. Then compare the two lists starting from the end to find the last item that is present in both lists. This is the nearest common ancestor and the complexity is just O(depth(tree)) which in a balanced binary tree is O(log n), whereas your approach could run in O(n) in the worst case. Of course my approach won't work if you don't have the back-link form a node to its parent. –  Sebastian Aug 23 '12 at 6:58
    
@ Sebastian, thanks for your comments. Ya it makes sense when we have back link. The algorithm I have written is with the assumption there is no back link. Would you like to suggest some other algorithm in this case? –  Manish Aug 23 '12 at 7:10
    
There can not be any better algorithm then O(n) if you don't have the back link. However, if you plan on running your LCA algorithm multiple times on the same binary tree then perhaps it is more efficient to construct and store a binary tree with the back links. Of course this doesn't solve your problem, and it may be over engineering at this point. –  csiz Aug 23 '12 at 8:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think I am able to fix it. I added another condition to see if my recursive findLCA is returning something. If so I return the same value further which fixed the issue. Plz provide your comments if this design is ok.

public static BinaryTreeNode findLCA( BinaryTreeNode root, BinaryTreeNode node1 , BinaryTreeNode node2) {       

    if (root == null) {
        return null;
    }       

    BinaryTreeNode left = root.getLeft();
    BinaryTreeNode right = root.getRight();
    BinaryTreeNode lcaNode1;
    BinaryTreeNode lcaNode2;

    if (left != null && (left == node1 || left == node2)) {
        return root;                
    }

    if (right != null && (right == node1 || right == node2)) {
        return root;                
    }
    lcaNode1 =  findLCA(left, node1, node2);
    lcaNode2 =  findLCA(right, node1, node2);

    if (( lcaNode1 != null) && lcaNode2 != null) {          
        return root;
    }

    if (lcaNode1 != null) {
        return lcaNode1;
    }

    if (lcaNode2 != null) {
        return lcaNode2;
    }       

    return null;        
}
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of adding this as an answer, you should update the original question. –  Chander Shivdasani Aug 23 '12 at 6:39
    
@chander, Ok. Any suggestions on algorithm? –  Manish Aug 23 '12 at 7:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.