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Why instance variable of super class is not overridden in sub class method see my code below..in which method print is overridden but variable a is not. and why code allow to write duplicate variable in subclass..

class B
{
     int a=10;
     public void print()
     {
         System.out.println("inside B super class");
     }

}
 class C extends B
 {
     int a=20;
     public void print()
     {
         System.out.println("inside C sub class");
     }


 }
public class A  {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B b=new C();
        b.print();//it will print inside c sub class
        System.out.println(b.a);//it will print super class variable value=10


    }

}
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3  
member variables are not polymorphic, only methods are See Also - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11974428/java-code-snippet-output-explanatio‌​n-required –  Jigar Joshi Aug 23 '12 at 6:59
    
    
possible dup : stackoverflow.com/questions/12078751/… –  Nandkumar Tekale Aug 23 '12 at 7:04
3  
@user1012372 this is an example of field hiding, not overriding. –  oldrinb Aug 23 '12 at 7:11
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Why instance variable of super class is not overridden in sub class method see my code below ...

Because instance variables CANNOT be overridden in Java. In Java only methods can be overridden.

When you declare a field with the same name as an existing field in a superclass, the new field hides the existing field. The existing field from the superclass is still present in the subclass, and can even be used ... subject to the normal Java access rules.

References:

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You may refer following section / examples in Java language specification that explains about the topic.

  1. Example 8.3.1.1-3. Hiding of Instance Variables
  2. Section 8.4.8. Inheritance, Overriding, and Hiding and related examples

Rest of my post is an additional information for those who are interested in scratching the surface of jvm internals on this subject. We can start by examining the byte codes generated for class A using javap. Following disassembles the byte codes into a human readable text based instructions (mnemonics).

javap -c A.class 

Without getting lost in many details of the entire dis-assembly, we can focus on the lines corresponding to b.print and b.a

9: invokevirtual #4                  // Method B.print:()V
...
...
16: getfield      #6                  // Field B.a:I

We can immediately infer that the op codes used for accessing the method and a variable are different. If you are from a C++ school, you could sense that all method calls are virtual by default in java.

Now let us write another class A1 identical to A, but just has a casting for accessing variable 'a' in C.

public class A1 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    B b=new C();
    b.print(); //casting is irrelevant here because methods are anyway bound at runtime     System.out.println(((C)b).a);// the casting allows us to access of value of a in C
  }
}

Compile the file and disassemble the class.

javap -c A1.class

You would notice that dis-assembly now points to C.a instead of B.a

19: getfield #6 // Field C.a:I

if you want to dig deep into this, here goes additional information:
- invokevirtual corresponds to opcode 0xb6
- getfield corresponds to opcode 0xb4

You can find a JVM specification that explains comprehensively about these opcodes at - http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jvms/se7/html/jvms-6.html
Check out in amazon.com for "Java Virtual Machine" books that could make life little more easier for decoding the specification.

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1  
This is all completely unnecessary, and a very poor way to approach the problem. You only have to refer to the Java Language Specification where these semantics are defined. –  EJP Aug 12 '13 at 0:49
    
You are right from the aspect that the JVM internal may not be needed for a simple answer. But I think it is useful in some cases to look under the hood especially when we have a convenient tool such as javap. I have slightly altered the post. Let me know if you have any additional feedback. –  Shree Aug 12 '13 at 2:16
    
Since you asked for more feedback ... this is about as "useful" as a driving instructor telling a learner driver to "look under the hood" to find out how to start a car ... IMO. –  Stephen C Aug 12 '13 at 7:13
1  
Opinion well taken and added reference to language spec. IMO - information provided is not totally irrelevant, may be useful for people from non-OO/different language background such as "C" who are curious enough to look under the hood - Thanks. –  Shree Aug 12 '13 at 12:24
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