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I have a script that is communicating with an outside server that sometimes throws out errors and mucks up my program. I have tried to workaround it, but it seems like it keeps throwing errors unless I manually restart the program.

Is there any way on Windows to have a python script restart itself on error? I see this ox.exec whenever I search these types of things and just can't seem to figure out making it work

In my main code: 
except:
    print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]
    logout()



def logout():
gv.logout()
time.sleep(20)
login()



def login():
try:
    gv.login(settings.user,settings.passw)
    textcheck()
except:
    print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]
    time.sleep(30)
    login()
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1  
it isn't possible for you to catch the exceptions? Can you post a code snippet (or, better, some error output) that shows what's going on? –  Jeff Tratner Aug 23 '12 at 7:10
    
Hey, I am catching them, but it seems to be coming from the server I'm contacting and I just need to restart it. I tried re-connecting to the server but it keeps spitting back the old error until I manually restart the program –  user1610719 Aug 23 '12 at 7:17
    
again, you really need to post some specifics for anyone to be able to help you. Part of the problem may be that you need to sleep your program for a bit when it starts getting errors from the server (maybe slowly increasing the interval or something). –  Jeff Tratner Aug 23 '12 at 7:19
    
added! Sorry I am using the sleep, and have tried doing the increasing time/etc. –  user1610719 Aug 23 '12 at 7:28
    
If it helps, I'm getting an error from another python script I'm importing, I'm new obviously to Python but is there a way to re-import a script? –  user1610719 Aug 23 '12 at 7:28

1 Answer 1

you can run another program to check if it is alive, e.g. python program update a heartbeat file every minutes, and your guarder process check if the files last modified time to see the other end is alive. you can also use WMI,just write a query

select * from win32_process where xxx 

to check if python script is running.

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What do you mean check if it is alive? –  user1610719 Aug 23 '12 at 8:26
    
if your script encounter some error can not handle gracefully, such as "memory can not read", "stack overflow", just quit your program, and guarder script can find out it is dead. –  Ted Shaw Aug 23 '12 at 8:39
    
I did a quick search for something like this and am currently coming up nill, any help on a lead to where I could start on something like this? –  user1610719 Aug 23 '12 at 8:58

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