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I ran into some trouble when converting bytes to gigabytes in my current project. Initially I did this:

 long requiredDiskSpace = 5000000000000; // In bytes
 int gb = (int)requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024;

This calculation becomes 0. (Correct should be 4 656). Then I switched to the decimal type, like this:

 long requiredDiskSpace = 5000000000000; // In bytes
 decimal gb = requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024;
 int gbAsInt = (int)gb;

This calculation (correctly) makes gbAsInt 4 656.

Now, my question is simply; why? To me, the calculations look similar, as I'm not interested in any decimal numbers I don't understand why I can't just use int in the actual calculation.

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Just a comment to you using decimal: It has nothing to do with decimal, but it works in this case because then you calculate the entire result before converting to int. The wrong part in the first example is that you convert requiredDiskSpace to int first (with loss), and then divide. –  awe Aug 23 '12 at 9:25
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7 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem is (int)requiredDiskSpace, the value 5000000000000 is way too big for an integer.

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There are some days when you just don't feel very clever. This is one of them :) Thanks a lot, and cheers also for the interesting discussions in the other answers' comments. Accepting this as its short and to the point in answering the question why. –  Amadeus Hein Aug 23 '12 at 8:34
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You are trying to cast 5000000000000 to an integer. This will not work properly because that number is greater than Int.MaxValue So you should infact do:

int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024);
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IMO result you get with this is not correct: everytime you divide requiredDiskSpace by 1024, result is truncated. At the end Gigabytes calculated is wrong because you go throught four truncations. Do you agree? You could use int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / ( 1024 * 1024 * 1024)); –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 8:00
    
@Marko: This is right if you are using the fractions at the end, but the fractions you loose are a long way down the chain, and they have no effect on the integer part of the later calculations. –  awe Aug 23 '12 at 9:12
    
Tested and proven false,,, sorry @Marco –  SynerCoder Aug 23 '12 at 9:30
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Your problem is (int) there. You are casting your long to int that way. But 5000000000000 cannot fit in a 32-bit integer so you end up with a completely different number between −231 and 231. Dividing that by 1073741824 then yields 0.

I suspect you just wanted the result to be casted to int:

int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024);
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IMO result you get with this is not correct: everytime you divide requiredDiskSpace by 1024, result is truncated. At the end Gigabytes calculated is wrong because you go throught four truncations. Do you agree? You could use int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / ( 1024 * 1024 * 1024)); –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 7:58
    
You're off by at most a GiB. In those size ranges that likely doesn't really matter, though. –  Јοеу Aug 23 '12 at 8:04
    
In fact in my answer I used double :) But OP is using int, so it's not your fault :) –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 8:06
    
With double for the calculation you probably want the ceiling or rounded value if you need an int in the end. But With the pure int calculation you just add 1 and be most likely correct (with exactly one exception). –  Јοеу Aug 23 '12 at 8:09
    
@Joey: I think adding 1 will (nearly) always make the result incorrect. Can you elaborate how you came to your conclusion? –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '12 at 8:14
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The reason is your cast. If you use parenthesis, it will work correctly:

(int)(requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024)

What happens in your code is this:

  1. 5000000000000 is cast to an int, resulting in 658067456 because of integer overflow.
  2. 658067456 is divided by 1024 resulting in 642644
  3. 642644 is divided by 1024 resulting in 627.58203125. As all operations are taking place on ints, the result really is 627 as decimals are stripped away.
  4. 627 is divided by 1024 resulting in 0.6123.. Again, decimals are stripped away and you end up with 0
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IMO result you get with this is not correct: everytime you divide requiredDiskSpace by 1024, result is truncated. At the end Gigabytes calculated is wrong because you go throught four truncations. Do you agree? You could use int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / ( 1024 * 1024 * 1024)); –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 7:57
    
@Marco: I guess you are right, but as the result is an int anyway, that most likely isn't a problem. Additionally, I am not sure, whether or not the compiler optimizes this to one operation requiredDiskSpace / 1073741824. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '12 at 8:01
    
@Marco: Your alternate proposal should be requiredDiskSpace / instead of requiredDiskSpace * –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '12 at 8:01
    
Well, my suggested formula uses just one approximation and only at the end, so it "could" be better. I don't know if compiler optimizes your formula: if so you're correct :) –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 8:02
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@Marco: I think there is not a single case, where it makes a difference. Try to come up with one. I did and couldn't find one. The reason is, that there is no rounding involved. The decimals are simply stripped away. Example 1073741823 will yield 0 in both cases. 1073741824 will yield 1 in both cases and 1073741825 will also yield 1 in both cases. –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 23 '12 at 8:21
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Cast after calculation:

    long requiredDiskSpace = 5000000000000; // In bytes
    int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / 1024 / 1024 / 1024);

When you cast immediately to int you lose value.

share|improve this answer
    
IMO result you get with this is not correct: everytime you divide requiredDiskSpace by 1024, result is truncated. At the end Gigabytes calculated is wrong because you go throught four truncations. Do you agree? You could use int gb = (int)(requiredDiskSpace / ( 1024 * 1024 * 1024)); –  Marco Aug 23 '12 at 8:00
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You are casting the byte value to an int, which is not able to hold such a big number.

long test = 5000000000000;
int value = (int)test; // value = 658067456

Dividing this value three times by 1024 will result in 627 / 1024 which equals (in integer arithmetic) 0.

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Because when you use integer division, result is truncated to be an integer everytime.
So you have zero in first attempt, even because 5000000000000 is too big to be stored in an int var.
You should use

double gb = 1.0d * requiredDiskSpace / (1024 * 1024 * 1024);
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If you are really concerned about keeping all the fractions, you should use decimal instead of double. With double you loose low level fractions along the way. At the end, using decimal you will get 4656.612873077392578125, but using double you will get 4656.6128730773926. –  awe Aug 23 '12 at 9:35
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