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Consider the following two alternatives.

A) Storing the key in the struct.

type Point struct {
    Place *datastore.Key
    Lat   float64
    Lon   float64
}

Then fetching using the key:

place := new(Place)
if err := datastore.Get(c, k, point.Place); err != nil {
    return err
} 

B) Storing the id

type Point struct {
    Place int64
    Lat   float64
    Lon   float64
}

Then fetching after creating the key.

k := datastore.NewKey(c, "Place", "", point.Place, nil)
place := new(Place)
if err := datastore.Get(c, k, place); err != nil {
    return err
} 

Storing the key instead of the id takes a bit more space. In order to see the tradeoff, it would be great to get a feeling for how much resources it takes to create a key. In other words, is it really cheap to create a key, or is it better to create it once and store it?

With a single key, it probably doesn't matter much, but let's say that I fetch a list of points, and for each point I want to retrieve the place (i.e. loop through the points to build an array of keys, and fetch them).

Edit: I am not thinking about allocating IDs or keys here, only using them (i.e. all points and places are already in the datastore, the question is just whether to store the id or the entire key).

Ex animo, Alexander Yngling

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Key is basically just a wrapper around a set of properties: kind, id/name, parent key(s), namespace.

So creating a Key from a kind and ID costs nothing, as this is a local operation (does not require Datastore).

OTOH, Key allocation does cost as this creates a Key with unique ID and this needs to Query a Datastore under the hood.

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Sorry, I was unclear. I did not mean cost as in money, I mean as in resources (i.e. locally). I want to understand the tradeoff between storing some extra information in the struct, and creating keys (not allocating) on the fly. –  yngling Aug 23 '12 at 9:09
    
Keys are a cheap wrapper –  Peter Knego Aug 23 '12 at 9:15
    
Let's say I fetch 100 000 points, and I want to get all the associated places. I either need to store 100 000 keys, or I need to generate 100 000 keys based on IDs. Do you feel that the cost of generating these keys are negligible? What if the number increases to a million? I am trying to understand the tradeoff involved :) –  yngling Aug 23 '12 at 9:22
3  
The keys must be "generated" (really just an object construction) in either case. The win when just storing the id is that the serialized datastore entity is smaller. So I'd go with that. –  Guido van Rossum Aug 23 '12 at 21:46

I think Peter gave a pretty good answer, but there's two things involved here:

  1. You seem to be asking whether it's cheaper to generate a key from an ID and store the ID to save storage cost, or store the actual key. Generating a key from an ID is a pretty simple hash, close to neglible - you probably have many more important things to worry about. I can't say how much it costs, but you can do a pretty simple experiement and loop a few hundred thousand times and estimate the cost. It probably is cheaper than storage, but I doubt it'd be very significant.

  2. The difficult part is generating the unique ID, which you didn't include in your question. For that, it's probably easier to just get a datastore key which is guaranteed to be unique.

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My apologies, but how is it difficult to generate a unique ID? In Go all you need to do is call datastore.AllocateIDs(c, "Point", nil, 1) if you want a single id (or change the number at the end if you want more). –  yngling Aug 23 '12 at 21:07
    
Yes, you can do that. That's the slow operation. Hashing the ID into a key is negligible in comparison. If you're doing that, there's not going to be any significant difference between the two methods, but you will save storage by just storing the ID. –  dragonx Aug 24 '12 at 0:37
1  
Creating a key from an ID doesn't involve hashing anything. –  Nick Johnson Aug 24 '12 at 10:32

As mentioned already creating a key costs nearly nothing; therefore, you would choose to store the ID which would save you some storage cost. The benefits to storing the Key is that it is typeded to what the id is actually pointing at and would prevent possible errors in your code. For example if you store the ID it is possible for you to retrieve that ID and then create a key fro the wrong entity in your code, if you store the key you don't need to worry about that mistake. And at the cost of the datastore the difference in storing a ID and a Key is probably negligible, the time you spent thinking about it is more valuable.

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