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What are the C++ rules for calling the superclass constructor from a subclass one??

For example I know in Java, you must do it as the first line of the subclass constructor (and if you don't an implicit call to a no-arg super constructor is assumed - giving you a compile error if that's missing).

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9 Answers 9

up vote 385 down vote accepted

Base class constructors are automatically called for you if they have no argument. If you want to call a superclass constructor with an argument, you must use the subclass's constructor initialization list. Unlike Java, C++ supports multiple inheritance (for better or worse), so the base class must be referred to by name, rather than "super()".

class SuperClass
{
    public:

        SuperClass(int foo)
        {
            // do something with foo
        }
};

class SubClass : public SuperClass
{
    public:

        SubClass(int foo, int bar)
        : SuperClass(foo)    // Call the superclass constructor in the subclass' initialization list.
        {
            // do something with bar
        }
};

More info on the constructor's initialization list here and here.

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21  
I removed 'explicit' from the SuperClass constructor. Despite being a best practice for single-argument constructors, it wasn't germane to the discussion at hand. For more info on the explicit key word, see: weblogs.asp.net/kennykerr/archive/2004/08/31/… –  luke Sep 24 '08 at 12:38
    
the colon : operator you used to invoke superclass constructor before instantiating child class constructor, I suppose this is also true for methods? –  hagubear Oct 31 at 9:33
    
@hagubear, only valid for constructors, AFAIK –  luke Oct 31 at 12:24

In C++, the no-argument constructors for all superclasses and member variables are called for you, before entering your constructor. If you want to pass them arguments, there is a separate syntax for this called "constructor chaining", which looks like this:

class Sub : public Base
{
  Sub(int x, int y)
  : Base(x), member(y)
  {
  }
  Type member;
};

If anything run at this point throws, the bases/members which had previously completed construction have their destructors called and the exception is rethrown to to the caller. If you want to catch exceptions during chaining, you must use a function try block:

class Sub : public Base
{
  Sub(int x, int y)
  try : Base(x), member(y)
  {
    // function body goes here
  } catch(const ExceptionType &e) {
    throw kaboom();
  }
  Type member;
};

In this form, note that the try block is the body of the function, rather than being inside the body of the function; this allows it to catch exceptions thrown by implicit or explicit member and base class initializations, as well as during the body of the function. However, if a function try block does not throw a different exception, the runtime will rethrow the original error; exceptions during initialization cannot be ignored.

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I'm not sure I understand the syntax of your second example... Is the try/catch construct a replacement for the constructor body? –  levik Sep 23 '08 at 13:47
2  
Yes. I've reworded the section, and fixed a mistake (the try keyword goes before the initialization list). I should have looked it up instead of writing from memory, it's not something that gets used often :-) –  puetzk Sep 23 '08 at 15:55
30  
Thanks for including the try/catch syntax for the initializers. I've been using C++ for 10 years, and this is the first time I've ever seen that. –  jakar Jun 8 '12 at 17:23
4  
I got to admit, been using C++ a long time, and that is the first time I have seen that try/catcn on the constructor list. –  Cameron Nov 21 '13 at 1:29

In C++ there is a concept of constructor's initialization list, which is where you can and should call the base class' constructor and where you should also initialize the data members. The initialization list comes after the constructor signature following a colon, and before the body of the constructor. Let's say we have a class A:


class A : public B
{
public:
  A(int a, int b, int c);
private:
  int b_, c_;
};

Then, assuming B has a constructor which takes an int, A's constructor may look like this:


A::A(int a, int b, int c) 
  : B(a), b_(b), c_(c) // initialization list
{
  // do something
}

As you can see, the constructor of the base class is called in the initialization list. Initializing the data members in the initialization list, by the way, is preferable to assigning the values for b_, and c_ inside the body of the constructor, because you are saving the extra cost of assignment.

Keep in mind, that data members are always initialized in the order in which they are declared in the class definition, regardless of their order in the initialization list. To avoid strange bugs, which may arise if your data members depend on each other, you should always make sure that the order of the members is the same in the initialization list and the class definition. For the same reason the base class constructor must be the first item in the initialization list. If you omit it altogether, then the default constructor for the base class will be called automatically. In that case, if the base class does not have a default constructor, you will get a compiler error.

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1  
Wait a second... You say initializers save on the cost of assignments. But don't the same assignments take place inside them if called? –  levik Sep 23 '08 at 13:39
2  
Nope. Init and assignment are different things. When a constructor is called, it will try to initialize every data member with whatever it thinks is the default value. In the init list you get to supply default values. So you incur initialization cost in either case. –  Dima Sep 23 '08 at 13:44
1  
And if you use assignment inside the body, then you incur the initialization cost anyway, and then the cost of assignment on top of that. –  Dima Sep 23 '08 at 13:44
1  
This answer was helpful because it showed the syntax variant where one has a header and a source file, and one does not want the initialization list in the header. Very helpful thank you. –  Ben Nov 11 at 17:17

The only way to pass values to a parent constructor is through an initialization list. The initilization list is implemented with a : and then a list of classes and the values to be passed to that classes constructor.

Class2::Class2(string id) : Class1(id) {
....
}

Also remember that if you have a constructor that takes no parameters on the parent class, it will be called automatically prior to the child constructor executing.

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Nice. In all of these excellent answers, this one was the first I understood and was applicable to my problem. Thanks ! –  Nicholas Aug 17 '12 at 14:31

If you have a constructor without arguments it will be called before the derived class constructor gets executed.

If you want to call a base-constructor with arguments you have to explicitly write that in the derived constructor like this:

class base
{
  public:
  base (int arg)
  {
  }
};

class derived : public base
{
  public:
  derived () : base (number)
  {
  }
};

You cannot construct a derived class without calling the parents constructor in C++. That either happens automatically if it's a non-arg C'tor, it happens if you call the derived constructor directly as shown above or your code won't compile.

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CDerived::CDerived()
: CBase(...), iCount(0)  //this is the initialisation list. You can initialise member variables here too. (e.g. iCount := 0)
    {
    //construct body
    }
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Everybody mentioned a constructor call through an initialization list, but nobody said that after that a parent's constructor can be called explicitly from the derived member's constructor body. See the question Calling a constructor of the base class from a subclass' constructor body
The point is that the call from the derived member's constructor body has nothing to do with construction of the parent's part of the child object. So maybe it should not be called "superclass constructor call". I put this answer here because somebody might get confused (as I did).

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2  
This answer is somewhat confusing even though I have read over it a couple of times and took a look at the linked to question. I think that what it is saying is that if you use an explicit call to a parent class or super class constructor in the body of a derived class, this is actually just creating an instance of the parent class and it is not invoking the parent class constructor on the derived object. The only way to invoke a parent class or super class constructor on a derived class' object is through the initialization list and not in the derived class constructor body. –  Richard Chambers Apr 19 at 13:22
    
@Richard Chambers It maybe confusing since English is not my first language, but you described precisely what I tried to say. –  TT_ Apr 19 at 23:56

Nobody talked here about the sequence of constructor call when a class derives from multiple classes. The sequence is as mentioned while deriving the classes.

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If you have default parameters in your base constructor the base class will be called automatically.

using namespace std;

class Base
{
    public:
    Base(int a=1) : _a(a) {}

    protected:
    int _a;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  public:
  Derived() {}

  void printit() { cout << _a << endl; }
};

int main()
{
   Derived d;
   d.printit();
   return 0;
}

Output is: 1

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