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I have a question about the following code in C++:

typedef struct {
    int id;
    int age;
} Group1;


typedef struct {
    int id;
    char name;
    float time;  
} Group2;


typedef union {
    Group1 group1;
    Group2 group2;
} ServiceData;

typedef struct {
    ServiceData data;
} Time;

Then I have a variable:

Group1 * group1;
group1 = new Group1;

group1->id = 10;
group1->age = 20;

Then there are two methods defined like this:

void method1(ServiceData * data) {
    //inside the method call method hello
    hello(data);
};

void hello(Group1 *group1) {
    printf("%d",group1->id);
}

I call method1 like this:

method1((ServiceData *)group1);

But inside method1, when the parameter group1 is passed to method hello(), I want to get the value of id inside of group1. Do I need to do any cast in hello method? Or inside of method1, do I need to cast it to (group*) before I pass it to hello()?

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3  
You don't need to typedef your struct and union in c++. You may just use struct Group1 {...}; –  arnoo Aug 23 '12 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need a cast, just to access the correct field in the union:

void method1(ServiceData * data) {
    //inside the method call method hello
    hello(&data->group1);
};
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I think that should be hello(&data->group1); –  TonyK Aug 23 '12 at 8:38
    
@TonyK yeah. :)\ –  Luchian Grigore Aug 23 '12 at 8:38
    
In this special case, the behavior is well defined. If several different structures have a common prefix, you can access that common prefix with the type of any of them. –  James Kanze Aug 23 '12 at 8:52
    
@JamesKanze do you have a reference for that? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 23 '12 at 8:55
    
@LuchianGrigore 9.5:1 If a standard-layout union contains several standard-layout structs that share a common initial sequence, [...] it is permitted to inspect the common initial sequence of any of standard-layout struct members. –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 9:32

Of course, you must write

  hello ( (Group1 * ) data);

(or write data->group1, other answer).

But do not do that, but use inheritance, if it's C++:

 struct GroupBase {
    int id;
    virtual ~GroupBase {
    }
 }

 struct Group1 : public GroupBase {
    int age;
    virtual ~Group1 { }
 }

 struct Group2 : public GroupBase {
    char name;
    float time;
    virtual ~Group2 { }
 }

 void method1 (GroupBase* data) {
    hello (std::dynamic_cast<Group1*> (data));
 }
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You're advising him to cast a union to one of its member's types? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 23 '12 at 8:37
    
You're right, that's a stupid idea. But in my opinion, it should work. –  JohnB Aug 23 '12 at 8:38

Instead of

method1((ServiceData *)group1);

you should do something like this:

ServiceData data;
data.group1.id = 10;
data.group1.age = 20;
method1(data);

And the implementation of method1 should look like

void method1(ServiceData * data) {
    hello(&data->group1);
};
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