Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is better to do?

self.call(1, True, "hi")

or

self.call(1, True, "hi",)

And what in the following cases:

self.call(
    1,
    True,
    "hi"
)

or

self.call(
    1,
    True,
    "hi",
)

?

Reasons for adding a trailing comma in data structures are familiar to me, but what about function calls?

share|improve this question
    
Can you outline these reasons? I've only ever felt compelled to do it in php and that's a language that makes me neaseous. –  Aesthete Aug 23 '12 at 8:37
    
I would follow the recommendations in PEP8 python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 –  Tim Hoffman Aug 23 '12 at 8:39
    
@TimHoffman: I've just skimmed through PEP 8. I couldn't find anything pertinent to this question there - could you point me to the relevant section? –  Tim Pietzcker Aug 23 '12 at 8:42
    
Yeah, I thought this one was in the PEP8, but I must have read it somewhere else. I have never left trailing ',' in a function/method definition or calling them, but usually use it for dicts and lists. Sorry for the misdirection. –  Tim Hoffman Aug 23 '12 at 9:41

2 Answers 2

In data structures, the trailing comma is "useful" for making it easier to add items:

a = [
      1,
      2,
      3,
    ]

is easier to change into

a = [
      1,
      2,
      3,
      4,
      5,
    ]

because you don't have to edit the line that says 3,.

But there is no such benefit in function calls which usually don't change in length. So I would discourage the use of a trailing comma.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the truth. That list bracket indenting style makes me want to rip out my hair though :) –  orlp Aug 23 '12 at 8:39
    
@nightcracker: You're right. Is it better now? –  Tim Pietzcker Aug 23 '12 at 8:41
    
If a function takes variable number of arguments, the trailing comma wouldn't hurt. –  Kos Aug 23 '12 at 8:45
    
@TimPietzcker: you're explaing how data structures work. Besides, for the second 2 options I gave, it COULD be as useful as in data structures. My question is more about 'which one is not possible? which one is recommended?' –  taper Aug 23 '12 at 8:46
    
@Kos: can you give an example? –  taper Aug 23 '12 at 8:47

I think there's no technical reason to avoid trailing slashes in function calls, but some people probably do find them distracting. Some may stop and say, "Hmmm, I wonder if that's really supposed to be there?"

I hesitate to call this a benefit, but one effect of using trailing slashes in conjunction with an indented style is to make version control diffs look a little bit cleaner when adding an argument.

For example, a function like this:

def my_fun(a, b, c=None):
    ...

...called like this:

my_fun(
    a='abc',
    b=123
)

...then changed to this:

my_fun(
    a='abc',
    b=123,
    c='def'
)

produces this diff in git:

$ git diff
...
 my_fun(
     a='abc',
-    b=123
+    b=123,
+    c='def'
 )

Whereas,

my_fun(
    a='abc',
    b=123,
)

changed to...

my_fun(
    a='abc',
    b=123,
    c='def',
)

produces this diff in git:

$ git diff
...
 my_fun(
     a='abc',
     b=123,
+    c='def',
 )
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.