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I can search for all rows with foo in the col1/col2 using match against:

SELECT col1, col2
FROM some_table
WHERE MATCH (col1,col2)
      AGAINST ('foo' IN BOOLEAN MODE);

But suppose I want to search for all rows with foo. (i.e. foo with a full-stop as the next character). On the docs page for Boolean Full-Text Searches, it doesn't mention full-stop being an operator, so I thought I could use either of these:

AGAINST ('foo.' IN BOOLEAN MODE);
AGAINST ('"foo."' IN BOOLEAN MODE);
AGAINST ('"foo\."' IN BOOLEAN MODE);

However, this returns the same results as:

AGAINST ('foo.couldBeAnything' IN BOOLEAN MODE);
AGAINST ('foo' IN BOOLEAN MODE);
AGAINST ('foo*' IN BOOLEAN MODE);

.

What is the . operator in this context? and how can I match-against foo.?

Note: I first asked this question about match-against foo.bar which led me to ask this follow up.

share|improve this question
    
can you try with AGAINST ('foo\.couldBeAnything' IN BOOLEAN MODE); – jcho360 Aug 23 '12 at 12:43
    
@jcho360 foo\.couldBeAnything does the same as foo.couldBeAnything. – Andy Hayden Aug 23 '12 at 14:15
    
Shot in the dark. What would foo\\.couldBeAnything do ? – Touki Aug 23 '12 at 14:24
    
Looks to me like the answer for this question will also be the same for this question as it was for the other question. Have you tried double quotes? – Nate C-K Aug 23 '12 at 14:45
    
@NateC-K yes, see above for what I have tried, each seem to be the same as searching only for foo. – Andy Hayden Aug 23 '12 at 15:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Full-stop, or indeed any punctuation, is treated like a space in a FULL-TEXT SEARCH, unfortunately this means there is no way to search for punctuation. The reasoning behind this is that text search is for finding "words" (which don't include punctuation).

To do such a search against punctuation, you could match against regular expressions, e.g. by using preg_match.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that's something new for me – jcho360 Aug 24 '12 at 12:13

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