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Hi I want to avoid using loops and so want to use something from plyr to help solve my problem.

I would like to create a function that gets the sum of a specifically chosen column for each factor from a dataframe.

So if we have the following example data...

df <- data.frame(cbind(x=rnorm(100),y=rnorm(100),z=rnorm(100),f=sample(1:10,100, replace=TRUE))) 
df$f <- as.factor(df$f)

i.e. I would like something like:

foo <- function(df.obj,colname){
     some code
}

where the df.obj would be the df variable above and the colname argument could be any of x,y or z.

and I would like the output/result of the function to have a column of the unique factors (in the above case 1:10) and the sums of the values in column x for each factor.

I expect that the solution to be quite simple and would probably be using ddply or summarise somehow but can't work out how to do it so that i can have the column name as an argument.

Thanks

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This appears a perfect fit for data.table. –  mnel Sep 10 '12 at 2:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this what you're after?

> ddply(df, .(f), colwise(sum))
    f          x           y          z
1   1 -0.4190284  2.61101681  1.2280026
2   2  1.1063977  2.40006922  4.9550079
3   3  0.4498366 -4.00610558  0.9964754
4   4  1.9325488 -2.81241212 -3.1185574
5   5 -4.1077670 -1.01232884 -3.9852388
6   6 -1.0488003 -2.42924689  3.5273636
7   7  2.2999306  0.85930085 -0.6245167
8   8 -4.8105311 -6.81352238 -2.1223436
9   9 -2.8187083  5.03391770  1.6433896
10 10  5.1323666 -0.06192382  1.8978994

Edit: correct answer as supplied by TS:

foo <- function(df.obj,colname){ddply(df, .(f), colwise(sum))[,c("f",colname)]}
share|improve this answer
1  
not quite... although close enough for me to figure it out from what you wrote...foo <- function(df.obj,colname){ddply(df, .(f), colwise(sum))[,c("f",colname)]} I did not know about the colwise functions...thanks you... –  h.l.m Aug 23 '12 at 9:33
    
out of curiosity if there was a second or thrid factor column and I wanted to sum according to that factor instead of f, how would I go about doing that...i.e. I would like to be adding the factor column name as an argument to the foo function –  h.l.m Aug 23 '12 at 9:57
1  
This: foo <- function(df.obj, factorname, colname){ddply(df, factorname, colwise(sum,is.numeric))[,c(factorname,colname)]} and call: foo(df, "g", "y") –  ROLO Aug 23 '12 at 10:06
    
amazing thanks! –  h.l.m Aug 23 '12 at 10:16

This seems a perfect fit for data.table and the lapply(.SD,FUN) and .SDcols arguments

  • .SD is a data.table containing the Subset of x's Data for each group, excluding the group column(s).
  • .SDcols is a vector containing the names of the columns to which you wish to apply the function (FUN)

An example

Setup the data.table

library(data.table)
DT <- as.data.table(df)

The sums of x,y,z columns by f

DT[, lapply(.SD, sum), by = f, .SDcols = c("x", "y", "z")]

##      f       x       y       z
##  1:  4  4.8041  3.9788  1.2519
##  2:  2  1.1255 -0.8147  2.9053
##  3:  3  0.9699 -0.1550 -8.5876
##  4:  9  2.2685 -1.2734  1.0506
##  5:  5 -0.1282 -2.5512  5.0668
##  6: 10 -2.7397  0.5290 -0.3638
##  7:  1  2.9544 -3.1139 -1.3884
##  8:  8 -4.3488  0.6894  1.4195
##  9:  7  2.3152  0.6474  2.7183
## 10:  6 -0.1569  1.0142  0.9156

The sums of x, and z columns by f

DT[, lapply(.SD, sum), by = f, .SDcols = c("x", "z")]

##      f       x       z
##  1:  4  4.8041  1.2519
##  2:  2  1.1255  2.9053
##  3:  3  0.9699 -8.5876
##  4:  9  2.2685  1.0506
##  5:  5 -0.1282  5.0668
##  6: 10 -2.7397 -0.3638
##  7:  1  2.9544 -1.3884
##  8:  8 -4.3488  1.4195
##  9:  7  2.3152  2.7183
## 10:  6 -0.1569  0.9156

Examples calculating the mean

DT[, lapply(.SD, mean), by = f, .SDcols = c("x", "y", "z")]

##      f        x        y        z
##  1:  4  0.36955  0.30606  0.09630
##  2:  2  0.10232 -0.07407  0.26412
##  3:  3  0.07461 -0.01193 -0.66059
##  4:  9  0.15123 -0.08489  0.07004
##  5:  5 -0.01425 -0.28346  0.56298
##  6: 10 -0.21075  0.04069 -0.02799
##  7:  1  0.29544 -0.31139 -0.13884
##  8:  8 -0.54360  0.08617  0.17744
##  9:  7  0.38586  0.10790  0.45305
## 10:  6 -0.07844  0.50710  0.45782

DT[, lapply(.SD, mean), by = f, .SDcols = c("x", "z")]

##      f        x        z
##  1:  4  0.36955  0.09630
##  2:  2  0.10232  0.26412
##  3:  3  0.07461 -0.66059
##  4:  9  0.15123  0.07004
##  5:  5 -0.01425  0.56298
##  6: 10 -0.21075 -0.02799
##  7:  1  0.29544 -0.13884
##  8:  8 -0.54360  0.17744
##  9:  7  0.38586  0.45305
## 10:  6 -0.07844  0.45782
share|improve this answer

I haven't got enough rep to comment so will have to ask in answer form - why do you want to avoid using loops in R?

EDIT: Anyway using plyr I'd use count()

share|improve this answer
    
Loops are generally an inefficient method of solving problems... –  h.l.m Aug 23 '12 at 9:03
    
also with regard to count...if you mean count(df,"f") (using my example) this merely counts the number of occurrences of each factor –  h.l.m Aug 23 '12 at 9:17
    
Surely whatever function that does this will use a loop even if you're not explicitly making one yourself? Also I think I must have misunderstood as I thought you wanted the number of occurrences of each factor –  James Elderfield Aug 23 '12 at 9:17
    
If not the number of occurrences perhaps you want to use the wt_var argument of count –  James Elderfield Aug 23 '12 at 9:24
2  
Loops are typically not much slower than alternative methods such as plyr or base R's apply functions. The real reason loops tend to be looked down upon in R is that code in a loop is evaluated in its parent environment making it easy to unintentionally overwrite other existing variables or create variables which break later code. By contrast, plyr and apply functions are evaluated in a new environment, making such side effects impossible unless explicitly intended. –  Michael Aug 31 '12 at 19:34

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