Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Inside one folder i have some files

UEDP01_20120821.csv
UEDP02_20120821.csv
UEDP03_20120821.csv
UEDP04_20120821.csv
UEDP05_20120821.csv

Just want to check all the files are present. If any one file is missing need to create one empty file with same name.

Eg:

UEDP01_20120821.csv
UEDP02_20120821.csv
UEDP04_20120821.csv
UEDP05_20120821.csv

UEDP03_20120821.csv if this file is missing, then need to create the same file.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks alot guys for your reply. let me try –  Mike Aug 23 '12 at 12:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How about this? Check if a regular file of the name exists. If it does not, create it.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @files = qw(
    UEDP01_20120821.csv
    UEDP02_20120821.csv
    UEDP03_20120821.csv
    UEDP04_20120821.csv
    UEDP05_20120821.csv
);

for my $file (@files) {
    next if -f $file;
    open my $fh, '>', $file or die $!;
}
share|improve this answer

If file.txt is your list of files, in bash:

while read fname; do
    [[ -f $fname ]] || touch "$fname"
done < file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
This will also work in ksh. –  me_and Aug 30 '12 at 12:41
    
Yeah, I think the only non-POSIX feature here is the [[...]], and I only used that to avoid the need to quote $fname. Change to [ -f "$fname" ] for full(?) POSIX compliance. –  chepner Aug 30 '12 at 12:49
1  
I believe read has inconsistent behaviour across POSIX-compliant implementations. I've no good source for that, and don't have the energy/impetus to look it up right now, but I know I've been told to avoid read when writing portable shell scripts. –  me_and Aug 30 '12 at 14:15
    
The spec only defines a single option (-r) for read, so if you avoid other options, perhaps read is safe. –  chepner Aug 30 '12 at 14:25

why do you need a script for this?

as dennis suggested you can use -a for just changing the access time of the existing files.

  touch -a UEDP0{1..5}_20120821.csv

will directly create the missing files.

share|improve this answer
2  
The downside of not testing for the presence of an existing file (as Anon ymous did) is that you unconditionally update the mtime of each file. You might want to preserve that information for existing files. –  JRFerguson Aug 23 '12 at 11:42
    
Yes ...but the OP's did not ask that he wants to preserve the mtime of existing files! –  Vijay Aug 23 '12 at 11:49
1  
It's a stretch to assume he does not. –  chepner Aug 23 '12 at 12:26
3  
Use touch -a and it will only change the access time, but will still create the missing files. The -a option is specified by POSIX. –  Dennis Williamson Aug 23 '12 at 13:11

Shell Script:-

for i in {1..5}
do
file="UEDP0${i}_20120821.csv"
if [ -f $file ]
then
    echo the file exists
else
 >$file
fi
done
share|improve this answer
1  
shell is not perl, don't use a $ on the left-hand side of an assignment. Also, I'd do the quoting a little differently: file="UEDP0${i}_20120821.csv" –  glenn jackman Aug 23 '12 at 14:24
    
@glennjackman:- yes you are right :) Done . –  perilbrain Aug 23 '12 at 14:27

If your list of files change dynamically then you can have a list of files in another file, which would make it easier:

If you have your files in a file called list then:

list will have the content:

  UEDP01_20120821.csv
  UEDP02_20120821.csv
  UEDP03_20120821.csv
  UEDP04_20120821.csv
  UEDP05_20120821.csv

awk 'system("touch "$1"");' list

would create the files if they don't exist.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a waste of a process -- cat. Simply do: `awk '{system("touch "$1"")}' list –  JRFerguson Aug 23 '12 at 11:37
    
@JRFerguson you're right. I was thinking different things posted as such! –  Blue Moon Aug 23 '12 at 11:57
1  
using awk just doesn't smell like the right tool, particularly as you're just calling out the shell anyway. –  glenn jackman Aug 23 '12 at 14:26

Just opening a file for output will create it for you.

You don't say where your list of file names comes from, but in the program below I have hard-coded it.

Note that there is no need to close the file handle $fh as it is closed automatically by Perl when the variable goes out of scope at the end of each cycle of the loop.

The -e operator will check whether a file exists. Alternatively you could use -f which is true if the node exists and isn't a directory. If there is already a directory by the same name then the open will fail

use strict;
use warnings;

my @files = qw/
  UEDP01_20120821.csv
  UEDP02_20120821.csv
  UEDP03_20120821.csv
  UEDP04_20120821.csv
  UEDP05_20120821.csv
/;

for my $file (@files) {
  open my $fh, '>', $file or die $! unless -e $file;
}

Update

As suggested by Bill Ruppert, you may prefer to open the files for append, regardless of whether they exist. This will create the files if necessary but leave them intact if they are already there

use strict;
use warnings;

my @files = qw/
  UEDP01_20120821.csv
  UEDP02_20120821.csv
  UEDP03_20120821.csv
  UEDP04_20120821.csv
  UEDP05_20120821.csv
/;

open my $fh, '>>', $_ or die $! for @files;
share|improve this answer
    
Will this overwrite the existing files when $fh goes out of scope at the end of the for loop? Perhaps us >> instead? –  Bill Ruppert Aug 23 '12 at 12:40
    
The unless modifier prevents existing files from ever being opened. –  chepner Aug 23 '12 at 14:59
    
@Bill Ruppert: The code is fine as it stands, but actually I think I prefer your way. An open to append will leave an existing file intact and create an empty file if it doesn't exist –  Borodin Aug 23 '12 at 15:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.