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I'm trying to create a char array made of some letters and numbers (the function was way more complex initially but i kept simplifying it to figure out why it doesn't work properly). So i have a char array in which i put 2 chars, and try to add some numbers to it. For a reason i can't figure out, the numbers do not get added to the array. It might be really stupid but I'm new to C so here's the simplified code. Any help is much appreciated, thanks!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char some_string[20];

char *make_str() {
  some_string[0] = 'a';
  some_string[1] = 'x';
  int random = 0;
  int rand_copy = 0;
  random = (rand());
  rand_copy = random;
  int count = 2;
  while ( rand_copy > 0 ) {
    rand_copy = rand_copy / 10;
    ++count;
  }
  int i=2;
  for (i=2; i<count; i++) {
    some_string[i] = random%10;
    random = random/10;
  }
  return (some_string);
}    

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
  printf("the string is: %s\n",make_str());
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Any number smaller than 32 (if I remember correctly) correspond to a non-printable char –  Saphrosit Aug 23 '12 at 11:27
    
@axesdenied Short story about characters: there are no such things as letters in a computer. Everything is binary numbers. The char type is no exception. When you write some_string[0] = 'a'; you are actually writing some_string[0] = 97;, the character literal is just easier to read than a raw ASCII number. random%10 gives a number between 0 to 9. ASCII digits have numbers between 48 ('0') and 57 ('9'). By typing + '0' here, you actually mean "give me a random number between 0-9, then add 48", which is equivalent to "give me a random number between 48 and 57. –  Lundin Aug 23 '12 at 12:54

1 Answer 1

You have many problems:

  1. resulting string is not zero-terminated. Add some_string[i] = '\0'; to fix this
  2. character (char) is something like "a letter", but random % 10 produces a number (int) which when converted to character results in control code (ASCII characters 0-9 are control codes). You'd better use some_string[i] = (random % 10) + '0';
  3. you're using fixed length string (20 characters), which may be enough, but it could lead to many problems. If you are a beginner and haven't learn dynamic memory allocation, than that's ok for now. But remember that fixed-length buffers are one of top-10 reasons for buggy C-code. And if you have to use fixed-length buffers (there are legitimate reason for doing this), ALLWAYS check if you are not overrunning the buffer. Use predefined constants for buffer length.
  4. unless the whole point of your excercise is to try converting numbers to strings, use libc function like snprintf for printing anything into a string.
  5. don't use global variable (some_string) and if you do (it's ok for a small example), there is no point in returning this value.

Slightly better version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define BUF_LENGTH 20
char some_string[BUF_LENGTH];

char *make_str() {
    some_string[0] = 'a';
    some_string[1] = 'x';
    int random = rand();
    int rand_copy = random;
    int count = 2;
    while (rand_copy > 0) {
        rand_copy = rand_copy / 10;
        ++count;
    }
    int i;
    for (i = 2; i < count; i++) {
        /* check for buffer overflow. -1 is for terminating zero */
        if (i >= BUF_LENGTH - 1) {
            printf("error\n");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        some_string[i] = (random % 10) + '0';
        random = random / 10;
    }
    /* zero-terminate the string */
    some_string[i] = '\0';
    return some_string;
}    

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
  printf("the string is: %s\n",make_str());
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"fixed-length buffers are one of top-10 reasons for buggy C-code". Yet dynamic memory leaks is even higher up on that top 10 list. Static buffers with their size set after some brain activity by the programmer are quite safe. Even safer if there are range checks and sanity checks present in the program, as there should be. –  Lundin Aug 23 '12 at 12:46
    
Being fixed-length has nothing to do with memory allocation. You can as easily write char *buf[20]; as you can write char *buf = (char*)malloc(20);. –  Jan Spurny Aug 23 '12 at 13:42
    
It has everything to do with memory allocation, since static arrays can't have variable length (unless they are VLAs). Btw you probably meant char buf[20]; and char *buf = malloc(20);. –  Lundin Aug 23 '12 at 13:59
    
yes, I meant char buf[20], thanks :) –  Jan Spurny Aug 23 '12 at 14:05
    
but no, when you use fixed number in source file, then it really doesn't matter if you allocate memory staticaly, dynamicaly in stack, in heap or wherever. If you have to change the number in source file to change the size of memory being allocated, than it's fixed-length buffer. So being "fixed-length" as in "if you have to edit source file and recompile to change it" really have nothing to do with memory allocation and you'll have the same problems no matter how the memory was allocated. –  Jan Spurny Aug 23 '12 at 14:18

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