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I am creating an OLAP-like package in Oracle where you call a main, controlling function that assembles its returning output table by making numerous left joins. These joined tables are defined in 'slave' functions within the package, which return specific subsets using static cursors, parameterised by the function's arguments. The thing is, these cursors are all very similar.

Is there a way, beyond generating dynamic queries and using them in a ref cursor, that I can generalise these. Every time I add a function, I get this weird feeling, as a developer, that this isn't particularly elegant!


Pseduocode

somePackage
  function go(param)
    return select    myRows.id,
                     stats1.value,
                     stats2.value
           from      myRows
           left join table(somePackage.stats1(param)) stats1
           on        stats1.id = myRows.id
           left join table(somePackage.stats2(param)) stats2
           on        stats2.id = myRows.id

  function stats1(param)
    return [RESULTS OF SOME QUERY]

  function stats2(param)
    return [RESULTS OF A RELATED QUERY]

The stats queries all have the same structure:

  • First they aggregate the data in a useful way
  • Then they split this data into logical sections, based on criteria, and aggregate again (e.g., by department, by region, etc.) then union the results
  • Then they return the results, cast into the relevant object type, so I can easily do a bulk collect

Something like:

cursor myCursor is
  with fullData as (
    [AGGREGATE DATA]
  ),
  fullStats as (
    [AGGREGATE FULLDATA BY TOWN]
    union all
    [AGGREGATE FULLDATA BY REGION]
    union all
    [AGGREGATE FULLDATA BY COUNTRY]
  )
  select myObjectType(fullStats.*)
  from   fullStats;

...

open myCursor;
fetch myCursor bulk collect into output limit 1000;
close myCursor;

return output;
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2  
Is your question "How do I generate dynamic queries without generating dynamic queries?" –  Ben Aug 23 '12 at 12:15
    
Point taken! My reasoning is that all my queries have an identical structure: so maybe a more accurate summary would be 'Can I create polymorphic cursors?' –  Xophmeister Aug 23 '12 at 12:25
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Filter operations can help build dynamic queries with static SQL. Especially when the column list is static.

You may have already considered this approach but discarded it for performance reasons. "Why execute every SQL block if we only need the results from one of them?" You're in luck, the optimizer already does this for you with a FILTER operation.

Example Query

First create a function that waits 5 seconds every time it is run. It will help find which query blocks were executed.

create or replace function slow_function return number is begin
    dbms_lock.sleep(5);
    return 1;
end;
/

This static query is controlled by bind variables. There are three query blocks but the entire query runs in 5 seconds instead of 15.

declare
  v_sum number;
  v_query1 number := 1;
  v_query2 number := 0;
  v_query3 number := 0;
begin
  select sum(total)
  into v_sum
  from
  (
    select total from (select slow_function() total from dual) where v_query1 = 1
    union all
    select total from (select slow_function() total from dual) where v_query2 = 1
    union all
    select total from (select slow_function() total from dual) where v_query3 = 1
  );
end;
/

Execution Plan

This performance is not the result of good luck; it's not simply Oracle randomly executing one predicate before another. Oracle analyzes the bind variables before run-time and does not even execute the irrelevant query blocks. That's what the FILTER operation below is doing. (Which is a poor name, many people generally refer to all predicates as "filters". But only some of them result in a FILTER operation.)

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor(sql_id => '0cfqc6a70kzmt'));

SQL_ID  0cfqc6a70kzmt, child number 0
-------------------------------------
SELECT SUM(TOTAL) FROM ( SELECT TOTAL FROM (SELECT SLOW_FUNCTION() 
TOTAL FROM DUAL) WHERE :B1 = 1 UNION ALL SELECT TOTAL FROM (SELECT 
SLOW_FUNCTION() TOTAL FROM DUAL) WHERE :B2 = 1 UNION ALL SELECT TOTAL 
FROM (SELECT SLOW_FUNCTION() TOTAL FROM DUAL) WHERE :B3 = 1 )

Plan hash value: 926033116

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation        | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT |      |       |       |     6 (100)|          |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE  |      |     1 |    13 |            |          |
|   2 |   VIEW           |      |     3 |    39 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    UNION-ALL     |      |       |       |            |          |
|*  4 |     FILTER       |      |       |       |            |          |
|   5 |      FAST DUAL   |      |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  6 |     FILTER       |      |       |       |            |          |
|   7 |      FAST DUAL   |      |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  8 |     FILTER       |      |       |       |            |          |
|   9 |      FAST DUAL   |      |     1 |       |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   4 - filter(:B1=1)
   6 - filter(:B2=1)
   8 - filter(:B3=1)

Issues

The FILTER operation is poorly documented. I can't explain in detail when it does or does not work, and exactly what affects it has on other parts of the query. For example, in the explain plan the Rows estimate is 3, but at run time Oracle should easily be able to estimate the cardinality is 1. Apparently the execution plan is not that dynamic, that poor cardinality estimate may cause later issues. Also, I've seen some weird cases where static expressions are not appropriately filtered. But if a query uses a simple equality predicate it should be fine.

This approach allows you remove all dynamic SQL and replace it with a large static SQL statement. Which has some advantages; dynamic SQL is often "ugly" and difficult to debug. But people only familiar with procedural programming tend to think of a single SQL statement as one huge God-function, a bad practice. They won't appreciate that the UNION ALLs create independent blocks of SQL

Dynamic SQL is Still Probably Better

In general I would recommend against this approach. What you have is good because it looks good. The main problem with dynamic SQL is that people don't treat it like real code; it's not commented or formatted and ends up looking like a horrible mess that nobody can understand. If you are able to spend the extra time to generate clean code then you should stick with that.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting :) To be honest, it's been so long since this problem came up, I'm not even sure what solution I went with. I think I stuck with similar functions and lived with the code duplication, rather than dynamic SQL generation, because it was faster (i.e., static cursors are optimised). However, it's always interesting to learn what tricks the optimiser has up its sleeve! Thanks :) –  Xophmeister May 11 at 18:48
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