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I'm trying to convert a png image in PHP the following way:

exec($cmd, $output, $return_code);

Where $cmd contains the following line of code:

/usr/bin/convert 'images/original/Id1741.png' -thumbnail x200 -quality '90' './cache/a3b84c5931d9619d12a9e244a310cb17_h200.png'

Calling this code on the command line works perfectly fine, but executing it on the webserver gives me the following error message:

Tried to execute : convert 'images/original/Id1741.png' -thumbnail x200 -quality '90' './cache/a3b84c5931d9619d12a9e244a310cb17_h200.png', return code: 1, output: Array()

If I remove the thumbnail option the command executes just fine on the webserver, but oviously it does not resize anything. So it's not a problem with permissions or the setup I guess.

PHP Version is 5.2.17. ImageMagick Version is: 6.6.0-4 2012-04-26

Anyone ever had a similar issue and can help me with this?

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I am wondering: why aren't you using imagecopyresampled or imagecopyresized? –  Jocelyn Aug 23 '12 at 12:30
    
Have you checked that the working directories and the file permissions are the same? It is likely that the web server runs your code in a different place with a different user id. –  ceving Aug 23 '12 at 13:14
    
As I stated in the question I don't think it's a permission problem, because the script runs fine if I remove the thumbnail option. It just copies the image from one directory to the other, but it works. As to the other two functions, I wasn't aware of them, so thanks for mentioning them. I'll have a look, but my main goal is to make the current work. –  Hendrik Simon Aug 23 '12 at 14:11
    
If you can't use the GD library, there is an ImageMagick extension for PHP as well, wehch would allow you to do this from within your PHP program. –  SDC Aug 23 '12 at 14:22
    
Ok, I finally got it fixed. After redirecting stderr to a file I found the following error: libgomp: Thread creation failed: Resource temporarily unavailable Seems that my hoster 1&1 recently upgraded the ImageMagick version which apparently uses more memory than the old one (at least that's what the hoster says). They recommend limiting the number of Threads created by ImageMagick: putenv('MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT=1'); I put this code into my init-script and now it works just fine! –  Hendrik Simon Aug 23 '12 at 15:35
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, I finally got it fixed. After redirecting stderr to a file I found the following error:

libgomp: Thread creation failed: Resource temporarily unavailable

Seems that my hoster 1&1 recently upgraded the ImageMagick version which apparently uses more memory than the old one (at least that's what the hoster says). They recommend limiting the number of Threads created by ImageMagick:

putenv('MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT=1');

I put this code into my init-script and now it works just fine!

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Worked like a charm. For use in Perl type: $ENV{'MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT'} = 1; –  Trendfischer Jun 28 '13 at 11:38
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You are converting to PNG, but you are setting -quality 90 (seemingly just analogue to the JPEG quality setting).

However, for PNG output, the -quality setting is very unlike JPEG's quality setting (which simply is an integer from 0 to 100).

For PNG it is composed by two single digits:

  • The first digit (tens) is (largely) the zlib compression level, and it may go from 0 to 9.
    (However the setting of 0 has a special meaning: when you use it you'll get Huffman compression, not zlib compression level 0. This is often better... Weird but true.)

  • The second digit is the PNG data encoding filter type (before it is compressed):

    • 0 is none,
    • 1 is "sub",
    • 2 is "up",
    • 3 is "average",
    • 4 is "Paeth", and
    • 5 is "adaptive".

In practical terms that means:

  • For illustrations with solid sequences of color a "none" filter (-quality 00) is typically the most appropriate.
  • For photos of natural landscapes an "adaptive" filtering (-quality 05) is generally the best.

Maybe you want to revisit your -quality 90 setting in the light of this info.

Maybe you were aware of it already. In this case: my apologies for 'preaching to the choir'. :-)

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I wasn't aware of it, so thanks for pointing this out. I just changed it. The problem that the command is not working on the webserver still exists! –  Hendrik Simon Aug 23 '12 at 14:14
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