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I am writing a node.js module that exports two functions and I want to call one function from the other but I see an undefined reference error.

Is there a pattern to do this? Do I just make a private function and wrap it?

Here's some example code:

(function() {
    "use strict";

    module.exports = function (params) {
        return {
            funcA: function() {
                console.log('funcA');
            },
            funcB: function() {
                funcA(); // ReferenceError: funcA is not defined
            }
        }
    }
}());
share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I like this way:

(function() {
    "use strict";

    module.exports = function (params) {
        var methods = {};

        methods.funcA = function() {
            console.log('funcA');
        };

        methods.funcB = function() {
            methods.funcA();
        };

        return methods;
    };
}());
share|improve this answer
1  
I use a var _public = {}; and var _privat = {}; and return the _public, which adds some readability. – K.. Aug 23 '12 at 12:27
2  
Or you can just use this.funcA()... – d11wtq Aug 23 '12 at 12:30
    
What does the "use strict" do here, btw? – d11wtq Aug 23 '12 at 12:31
1  
@d11wtq "use strict" is a new flag for ECMA Script 5 that helps catch a few errors. More at stackoverflow.com/questions/1335851/… – andymurd Aug 27 '12 at 6:28
    
There are many ways to do it, but I like this one : it is readable, allows exporting and referencing methods in the same file, and has clear encapsulation. For debugging purposes though, I personally name my functions. – nha Oct 1 '14 at 18:51

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