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I'm not sure, how to free DirectoryEntry object, when I worked with it's children. Do I need to free all childs aтd then free parent or just free parent?

For example,

using(DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry())
{
    foreach (DirectoryEntry childEntry in entry.Children)
    {
        ....
    }   
}

Is it enough?

Or need additional code such as

using(DirectoryEntry entry = new DirectoryEntry())
{
    foreach (DirectoryEntry childEntry in entry.Children)
    {
        using(childEntry)
        {
            ...
        }
    }   
}

?

share|improve this question
    
Not a good idea to manipulate a collection during iteration. This will (and should) probably throw an exception. – Patrik Aug 23 '12 at 12:20
    
@Patrik, he is not manipulating the collection itself, just the items. Disposing doesn't remove from the collection. – Amiram Korach Aug 23 '12 at 12:22
    
foreach (DirectoryEntry childEntry in entry.Children)... – Patrik Aug 23 '12 at 12:37
    
is foreach deprecated in C#, now? ) – hardsky Aug 23 '12 at 12:40
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to free every enumerated child.

Moreover, you should note, that DirectoryEntry.Children returns newly created object every time you access its getter. This is disgustingly, because it is a rough violation of MS own guidelines (DirectoryEntry.Children must be a method), but it is true.

So:

  • every time you enumerate children, you get new instances;
  • parent entry knows nothing about created instances of enumerator, and child entries, created by enumerator.
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