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I'm trying to combine these 2 arguments to make my function work

#!/bin/bash

while [ $? -gt 0 ] 
do
  case "$1" in             
    [0-9]*-[0-9]*)
      for ip in $(sec ${1%-*} ${##*-})
      do
        ping -c 1 192.168.1.$ip
        (shift)?
      done
      ;;
    a)
      >/dev/null;
      [ $? -eq 0 ] && echo "192.168.1.$ip is up!" ||:;
      ;;
  esac
done

Normally if I put it both functions in the [0-9]*-[0-9]*) argument we can get for example as output

someTest.sh 90-105 

It would check for IP numbers between 90 and 105 But i would like to do it like this:

sometest.sh 90-105 -a
share|improve this question
2  
Your last done and esac are flipped. And what on earth are you trying to do with the a) case? –  Kevin Aug 23 '12 at 12:27
    
sec should be seq; ${##*-} should be ${1#*-} (I think). –  chepner Aug 23 '12 at 12:58
    
I've reformatted the code to make it more readable and fixed obvious mistakes; I hope I didn't eat something. Please fix the remaining ones yourself, or at least explain what things like >/dev/null are supposed to do here. –  Michał Górny Aug 24 '12 at 10:28

2 Answers 2

If what you want to do is ping IPs within a certain range, and also to be able to pass additional arguments (-a and/or -b), you could look at getopts to easily deal with as many arguments as you need, with or without options:

usage()
{
cat << EOF
usage: $0 options iprange

OPTIONS:
   -a      set a option
   -b      set b option
   -r      set rangei, e.g 1 10
EOF
}

A=
B=

while getopts “abr:” OPTION
do
     case $OPTION in
         a)
             A=1
             ;;
         b)
             B=1
             ;;
         r)  
             RANGE="$OPTARG"
             ;;
         ?)
             usage
             exit
             ;;
     esac
done

for i in $(seq $RANGE); do
    ping -c 1 -w 1 192.168.1.$i  >> /dev/null 2>&1

    if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
        echo "192.168.1.$i is up";
    else
        echo "192.168.1.$i is down";
fi
done

You would call this like:

./somescript.sh -a -b -r "10 34"

You can check the $A and $B variables and do whatever you want to do based on their values.

I know, no dash between the range delimeters and you need the quotes, wrote this quickly, you could use something like KingsIndian's solution above to deal with that.

share|improve this answer
    
Also the idiomatic way to write the conditional is if ping -c etc; then echo host is up; else echo host is down; fi instead of examining $?. –  tripleee Aug 23 '12 at 16:51

I see that you want to check whether the machines are up or down from the range you specify from the command line. You can simply do it using a for loop.

#!/bin/bash

a=$1;
b=$2;

for ((i=a;i<=b;i++)) do

   ping -c 1 -w 1 192.168.1.$i  >> /dev/null 2>&1

   if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
      echo "192.168.1.$i is up";
   else
      echo "192.168.1.$i is down";
   fi

done

From the command line, run it: ./script 10 50 to ping the machines from 192.168.1.10 to 192.168.1.50.


If you want to pass the arguments like: ./script 10-50 then you can do that as well:

#!/bin/bash

OLDIFS=$IFS
IFS=$'\-'
set $@

a=$1;
shift;
b=$1;

for ((i=a;i<=b;i++)) do

   ping -c 1 -w 1 192.168.1.$i  >> /dev/null 2>&1
   if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
     echo "192.168.1.$i is up";
   else
     echo "192.168.1.$i is down";
   fi

done

IFS=$OLDIFS

share|improve this answer
    
yes but, is it also possible to use a shift in order to paste those 2 arguments? –  mrName Aug 23 '12 at 12:38
    
That's right, shift will work. But you don't have use case with shifts and then using it to check the range. this is fairly straight-forward with a loop. –  Blue Moon Aug 23 '12 at 12:41
    
but what if like you want to make a small script lets say [nrYY]-[nrXX]) is one argument like the one i showed you above and another argument for example a) this argument will only show you the good ones –  mrName Aug 23 '12 at 12:48
    
You'll need to catch the -a argument before you start pinging. $? is only valid for the immediately previous command. As is, by the time you see -a, you've already pinged everything. –  chepner Aug 23 '12 at 13:00
    
@mrName Updated to give argument in that format as well. –  Blue Moon Aug 23 '12 at 13:07

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