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I have a few boxplots in matplotlib that I want to zoom in on a particular y-range ([0,0.1]) using inset axes. It is not clear to me from the example in the documentation how I should do this for multiple boxplots on the same figure. I was trying to modify the code provided this example, but there was too much unnecessary complexity. My code is pretty simple:

# dataToPlot is a list of lists, containing some data. 
plt.figure()
plt.boxplot(dataToPlot)
plt.savefig( 'image.jpeg', bbox_inches=0)

How do I add inset axes and zoom in on the first boxplot of the two? How can I do it for both?

EDIT: I tried the code below, but here's what I got: enter image description here

What went wrong?

# what's the meaning of these two parameters?
fig = plt.figure(1, [5,4])
# what does 111 mean?
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.boxplot(data)
# ax.set_xlim(0,21)  # done automatically based on the no. of samples, right?
# ax.set_ylim(0,300) # done automatically based on max value in my samples, right?
# Create the zoomed axes
axins = zoomed_inset_axes(ax, 6, loc=1) # zoom = 6, location = 1 (upper right)
axins.boxplot(data)
# sub region of the original image
#here I am selecting the first boxplot by choosing appropriate values for x1 and x2 
# on the y-axis, I'm selecting the range which I want to zoom in, right?
x1, x2, y1, y2 = 0.9, 1.1, 0.0, 0.01
axins.set_xlim(x1, x2)
axins.set_ylim(y1, y2)
# even though it's false, I still see all numbers on both axes, how do I remove them?
plt.xticks(visible=False)
plt.yticks(visible=False)
# draw a bbox of the region of the inset axes in the parent axes and
# connecting lines between the bbox and the inset axes area
# what are fc and ec here? where do loc1 and loc2 come from?
mark_inset(ax, axins, loc1=2, loc2=4, fc="none", ec="0.5")
plt.savefig( 'img.jpeg', bbox_inches=0)
share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I know what you mean by "multiple boxplots on the same figure". Do you have multiple subplots? –  samb8s Aug 23 '12 at 14:25
    
No, dataToPlot contains more than one sample of data, and plt.boxplot treats it as such: it draws as many boxplots as there are samples in its input. –  Ricky Robinson Aug 23 '12 at 14:28
    
So, can't you just do another axins=zoomed_inset_axes(ax,6,loc=2) and set different coordinate range for this next plot? –  samb8s Aug 23 '12 at 14:32
    
I'm not setting the position of each boxplot, so I don't know where they will appear exactly. Or am I missing something? –  Ricky Robinson Aug 23 '12 at 14:42
    
Maybe I don't exactly know what your question is... do you want to set the range of the zoom plots automatically, rather than explicitly typing the yrange? –  samb8s Aug 23 '12 at 14:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The loc determines the location of the zoomed axis, 1 for upper right, 2 for upper left and so on. I modified the example code slightly to generate multiple zoomed axis.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1.inset_locator import zoomed_inset_axes
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1.inset_locator import mark_inset

import numpy as np

def get_demo_image():
    from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
    import numpy as np
    f = get_sample_data("axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy", asfileobj=False)
    z = np.load(f)
    # z is a numpy array of 15x15
    return z, (-3,4,-4,3)


fig = plt.figure(1, [5,4])
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

# prepare the demo image
Z, extent = get_demo_image()
Z2 = np.zeros([150, 150], dtype="d")
ny, nx = Z.shape
Z2[30:30+ny, 30:30+nx] = Z

# extent = [-3, 4, -4, 3]
ax.imshow(Z2, extent=extent, interpolation="nearest",
          origin="lower")

axins = zoomed_inset_axes(ax, 6, loc=1) # zoom = 6
axins.imshow(Z2, extent=extent, interpolation="nearest",
             origin="lower")

# sub region of the original image
x1, x2, y1, y2 = -1.5, -0.9, -2.5, -1.9
axins.set_xlim(x1, x2)
axins.set_ylim(y1, y2)

axins1 = zoomed_inset_axes(ax, 8, loc=2) # zoom = 6
axins1.imshow(Z2, extent=extent, interpolation="nearest",
             origin="lower")

# sub region of the original image
x1, x2, y1, y2 = -1.2, -0.9, -2.2, -1.9
axins1.set_xlim(x1, x2)
axins1.set_ylim(y1, y2)

plt.xticks(visible=False)
plt.yticks(visible=False)

# draw a bbox of the region of the inset axes in the parent axes and
# connecting lines between the bbox and the inset axes area
mark_inset(ax, axins, loc1=2, loc2=4, fc="none", ec="0.5")
mark_inset(ax, axins1, loc1=2, loc2=4, fc="none", ec="0.5")

plt.draw()
plt.show()

enter image description here

Edit1:

Similarly, you can also add zoomed axis in boxplot. Here is an example

from pylab import *
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1.inset_locator import zoomed_inset_axes
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1.inset_locator import mark_inset

# fake up some data
spread= rand(50) * 100 
center = ones(25) * 50
flier_high = rand(10) * 100 + 100
flier_low = rand(10) * -100
data =concatenate((spread, center, flier_high, flier_low), 0)

# fake up some more data
spread= rand(50) * 100
center = ones(25) * 40
flier_high = rand(10) * 100 + 100
flier_low = rand(10) * -100
d2 = concatenate( (spread, center, flier_high, flier_low), 0 )
data.shape = (-1, 1)
d2.shape = (-1, 1)
data = [data, d2, d2[::2,0]]

# multiple box plots on one figure
fig = plt.figure(1, [5,4])
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.boxplot(data)
ax.set_xlim(0.5,5)
ax.set_ylim(0,300)

# Create the zoomed axes
axins = zoomed_inset_axes(ax, 3, loc=1) # zoom = 3, location = 1 (upper right)
axins.boxplot(data)

# sub region of the original image
x1, x2, y1, y2 = 0.9, 1.1, 125, 175
axins.set_xlim(x1, x2)
axins.set_ylim(y1, y2)
plt.xticks(visible=False)
plt.yticks(visible=False)

# draw a bbox of the region of the inset axes in the parent axes and
# connecting lines between the bbox and the inset axes area
mark_inset(ax, axins, loc1=2, loc2=4, fc="none", ec="0.5")

show() 

enter image description here

Edit2

In case the distribution is heterogeneous, i.e., most values are small with few very large values, the above zooming procedure might not work, as it will zoom both the x as well as y axis. In that case it is better to change the scale of y-axis to log.

from pylab import *

# fake up some data
spread= rand(50) * 1
center = ones(25) * .5
flier_high = rand(10) * 100 + 100
flier_low = rand(10) * -100
data =concatenate((spread, center, flier_high, flier_low), 0)

# fake up some more data
spread= rand(50) * 1
center = ones(25) * .4
flier_high = rand(10) * 100 + 100
flier_low = rand(10) * -100
d2 = concatenate( (spread, center, flier_high, flier_low), 0 )
data.shape = (-1, 1)
d2.shape = (-1, 1)
data = [data, d2, d2[::2,0]]

# multiple box plots on one figure
fig = plt.figure(1, [5,4]) # Figure Size
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)  # Only 1 subplot 
ax.boxplot(data)
ax.set_xlim(0.5,5)
ax.set_ylim(.1,300)
ax.set_yscale('log')

show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. The documentation on this is still too complex for my purposes. I edited my original post to stress what I'm doing right now and removed all the unnecessary lines from the online example. Could you please modify my code, so I can see what I should actually do? Thanks. –  Ricky Robinson Aug 27 '12 at 20:15
1  
Check the edited answer. If you have difficulty in understanding any specific part of the code, do let me know. –  imsc Aug 28 '12 at 7:40
    
Thank you. I edited my post and added the output of your code and questions on some of the parameters used. –  Ricky Robinson Aug 28 '12 at 13:54
1  
You put y1, y2 = 0.0, 0.01 and zoom = 6. This means that in your zoomed y-axis is 0.06 which is still much smaller than [0-250] range in the main axis. You either have to increase the zoom or the y1, y2 value. –  imsc Aug 28 '12 at 14:01
    
OK, thanks. It doesn't seem to be working as I expected. I wanted to show where the median is, that is, I wanted to show the range where the blue rectangle lies, but when I zoom in too much, it also zooms in on the x-axis and it is a bit of a mess. –  Ricky Robinson Aug 28 '12 at 14:56

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