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Suppose I have these two lists:

column1 = ["soft","pregnant","tall"]
column2 = ["skin","woman", "man"]

How do I loop print through these two lists while using a custom, fixed space(say 10, as in example) starting from the first letter of each element of the first list up to the first letter of each element of the second list?

Example output of a set spacing of 10:

soft      skin
pregnant  woman 
tall      man
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2  
zip docs.python.org/library/functions.html#zip –  bpgergo Aug 23 '12 at 12:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Easily done with the string formatting,

column1 = ["soft","pregnant","tall"]
column2 = ["skin","woman", "man"]

for c1, c2 in zip(column1, column2):
    print "%-9s %s" % (c1, c2)

Or you can use str.ljust, which is tidier if you want to have the padding be based on a variable:

padding = 9
for c1, c2 in zip(column1, column2):
    print "%s %s" % (c1.ljust(padding), c2)

(note: padding is 9 instead of 10 because of the hard-coded space between the words)

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As written, both of these solutions will have three spaces, not two, between the "t" of "pregnant" and the "w" of "woman". You can remove the space in the printed string, I think. –  DSM Aug 23 '12 at 12:45
    
Suppose the elements of the second column would contain strings longer then the width of my terminal screen. The default behavior is that that those strings will 'spill' over my first column. How do let each such long strings continue from the starting point of the second column? –  Bentley4 Aug 23 '12 at 13:11
    
@DSM True, reducing the padding-amount by one will match the expected output exactly. Removing the space between the %s might result in the words being smushed together. Edited answer –  dbr Aug 23 '12 at 15:24
1  
@Bentley4 You could try clint which does column wrapping based on the terminal size. You could do something similar yourself with this answer and the textwrap module, but it would be rather fiddly.. –  dbr Aug 23 '12 at 15:33

How about:

>>> column1 = ["soft","pregnant","tall"]
>>> column2 = ["skin","woman", "man"]
>>> for line in zip(column1, column2):
...     print '{:10}{}'.format(*line)
... 
soft      skin
pregnant  woman
tall      man
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column1 = ["soft","pregnant","tall"]
column2 = ["skin","woman", "man"]

for row in zip(column1, column2):
    print "%-9s %s" % row # formatted to a width of 9 with one extra space after
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>>> column1 = ["soft","pregnant","tall"]
>>> column2 = ["skin","woman", "man"]
>>> zip(column1, column2)
[('soft', 'skin'), ('pregnant', 'woman'), ('tall', 'man')]
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One liner using new style string formatting:

>>> column1 = ["soft", "pregnant", "tall"]
>>> column2 = ["skin", "woman", "man"]

>>> print "\n".join("{0}\t{1}".format(a, b) for a, b in zip(column1, column2))

soft        skin
pregnant    woman
tall        man
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