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I am currently working on a project, which involves altering data stored in a MYSQL database. Since the table that I am working on does not have a key, I add a key with the following command:

ALTER TABLE deCoupledData ADD COLUMN MY_KEY INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT KEY

Due to the fact that I want to group my records according to selected fields, I try to create an index for the table deCoupledData that consists of MY_KEY, along with the selected fields. For example, If I want to work with the fields STATED_F and NOT_STATED_F, I type:

ALTER TABLE deCoupledData ADD INDEX (MY_KEY, STATED_F, NOT_STATED_F)

The real issue is that the fields that I usually work with are more than 16, so MYSQL does not allow super-keys longer than 16 fields. In conclusion, Is there another way to do this? Can I make (somehow) MYSQL to order the records according to the desired super-key (something like clustering)? I really need to make my script faster and the main overhead is that each group may contain records which are not stored on the same page of the disk, and I assume that my pc starts random I/Os in order to retrieve records.

Thank you for your time. Nick Katsipoulakis

CREATE TABLE deCoupledData ( 
AA double NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', 
STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, 
NOT_STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, 
MIN_VALUES varchar(128) NOT NULL DEFAULT '-1,-1', 
MY_KEY int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, 
PRIMARY KEY (MY_KEY), 
KEY AA (AA) ) 
ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=74358 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
share|improve this question
    
Ever heard of "overindexing"? Please do a SHOW CREATE TABLE deCoupledData and post the result. Also don't confuse keyword KEY with PRIMARY KEY, a simple KEY is a synonym for INDEX, so I guess you don't even have a primary key. –  fancyPants Aug 23 '12 at 13:47
    
CREATE TABLE deCoupledData ( AA double NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, NOT_STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, MIN_VALUES varchar(128) NOT NULL DEFAULT '-1,-1', MY_KEY int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, PRIMARY KEY (MY_KEY), KEY AA (AA) ) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=74358 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 –  nick.katsip Aug 23 '12 at 14:02
    
Also I do not know how to edit it to look like sql code. So, I am sorry in advance for the inconvenience. –  nick.katsip Aug 23 '12 at 14:03
    
I think your real question is: "How do I make my SQL queries faster?". An index is not always the answer. Sometimes table layout is the answer. You should maybe post a new question that has your actual SQL query, table layout, and performance questions. –  Jordan Aug 23 '12 at 14:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, first of all, when you add an index over multiple columns and you don't really use the first column, the index is useless.

Example: You have a query like

SELECT *
FROM deCoupledData 
WHERE
stated_f = 5
AND not_stated_f = 10

and an index over (MY_KEY, STATED_F, NOT_STATED_F).

The index can only be used, if you have another AND my_key = 1 or something in the WHERE clause.

Imagine you want to look up every person in a telephone book with first name 'John'. Then the knowledge that the book is sorted by last name is useless, you still have to look up every single name.

Also, the primary key does not have to be a surrogate / artificial one. It's nearly always better to have a primary key which is made up of columns which identify each row uniquely anyway.

Also it's not always good to have many indexes. Not only do indexes slow down INSERTs and UPDATEs, sometimes they just cause an extra lookup, since first a look at the index is taken and a second look to find the actual data.

That's just a few tips. Maybe Jordan's hint is not a bad idea, "You should maybe post a new question that has your actual SQL query, table layout, and performance questions".

UPDATE:

Yes, that is possible. According to manual

If you define a PRIMARY KEY on your table, InnoDB uses it as the clustered index.

which means that the data is practically sorted on disk, yes.

Be aware that it's also possible to define a primary key over multiple columns!

Like

CREATE TABLE deCoupledData ( 
AA double NOT NULL DEFAULT '0', 
STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, 
NOT_STATED_F double DEFAULT NULL, 
MIN_VALUES varchar(128) NOT NULL DEFAULT '-1,-1', 
MY_KEY int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, 
PRIMARY KEY (NOT_STATED_F, STATED_F, AA), 
KEY AA (AA) ) 
ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=74358 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

as long as the combination of the columns is unique.

share|improve this answer
    
At first, I would like to thank you for your immediate and helpful answers. As far as the queries are concerned, I use the MY_KEY field as a condition (WHERE clause). Also, I would use another field as a key, but none of them is unique. My main question is if there is any way in MYSQL to command the MYSQL server to organize the data file according to the fields I provide to it. –  nick.katsip Aug 23 '12 at 14:25
    
@popanik Updated my answer. –  fancyPants Aug 23 '12 at 14:35

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