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I have two tables, A and B, A contains a list of entries and B for each of those entries multiple status rows (0-n, grouped by date with a status 0 for okay and 1 for failure).

Now I would like to select all rows from A with their respective most recent status and its date as well as the most recent failure and its date (failure defined as having at least one entry with 1).

I tried something with two left joins but am not convinced it is the optimal solution and also still have issues with determining the correct number of failures (SUM(b2.status))

SELECT a.id, b1.date, SUM(b1.status), b2.date, SUM(b2.status) FROM tablea a
LEFT JOIN tableb b1 ON b1.aid=a.id
LEFT JOIN tableb b2 ON b2.aid=a.id

WHERE (b1.date=(SELECT MAX(`date`) FROM tableb WHERE aid=a.id) OR b1.date IS NULL)
AND (b2.date=(SELECT MAX(`date`) FROM tableb WHERE aid=a.id GROUP BY `date` HAVING SUM(`status`)>0) OR b2.date IS NULL)

GROUP BY a.id
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Whoops, I think every assumption I made to this point has been wrong. I think this will give you what you want. It will give you the total number of failures for the latest date that had a failure.

I'm not sure how performance will be on a very large database, but it works fine on a smaller one.

SELECT a.id, MAX(b1.date) status_date, SUM(b1.status) latest_status, 
       b2.date latest_failure,
       b2.total_failures

FROM tablea a

     LEFT JOIN tableb b1
     ON b1.aid = a.id
     AND b1.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id)

     LEFT JOIN 
     (SELECT aid, date, count(*) total_failures FROM tableb WHERE status > 0 GROUP BY aid, date) b2
     ON b2.aid = a.id
     AND b2.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0)

GROUP BY a.id;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. That seems to do the trick. My second join was apparently incomplete. –  user1616166 Aug 23 '12 at 17:28
    
Yeah, the problem was that if b1 was returning 2 rows and b2 was returning 2 rows, you would get 4 rows and your failure count would be doubled. Or if you have 3 rows, it could be tripled, etc. With the above, b2 only returns a single row. –  Tom Aug 23 '12 at 17:47

Something like this should work.

SELECT a.id, b1.date status_date, b1.status, b2.date latest_failure, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0) total_failures

FROM tablea a

     LEFT JOIN tableb b1
     ON b1.aid = a.id
     AND b1.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id)

     LEFT JOIN tableb b2
     ON b2.aid = a.id
     AND b2.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0)

This is assuming that the tableb.date field is a datetime and is unique. Otherwise you may wish to use an id field instead.

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Thanks, tried both but not getting the right result with either unfortunately. Yes, date is not unique as it groups the status entries. –  user1616166 Aug 23 '12 at 15:04
    
Yeah if date is not unique, this won't work. I was thinking date might be a datetime field. Do you have a unique id on tableb? If so would the max(ID) be the latest one? –  Tom Aug 23 '12 at 15:08
    
If possible I would like to avoid introducing an id. Also I guess it would only take the last entry, while it should take the last batch of entries (by date). Basically the logic would be, fetch all from A and then join B and give me the date and combined status of the most recent entries along with the date and combined status where the latter is >0 (failure). –  user1616166 Aug 23 '12 at 15:18
    
Ok, I got you. I was thinking you wanted the status of the latest record in tableb, not the status of the latest date. Now I understand what you are doing better. –  Tom Aug 23 '12 at 15:28

You could do this also. Not sure which one is more efficient. You could try it both ways.

SELECT a.id, b1.date status_date, b1.status, 
       (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0) latest_failure, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*)  FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0) total_failures

FROM tablea a

     LEFT JOIN tableb b1
     ON b1.aid = a.id
     AND b1.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id)
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This should work.

SELECT a.id, MAX(b1.date) status_date, SUM(b1.status) latest_status, 
       (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0) latest_failure,
       (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tableb  WHERE aid = a.id AND status > 0) total_failures

FROM tablea a

     LEFT JOIN tableb b1
     ON b1.aid = a.id
     AND b1.date = (SELECT MAX(date) FROM tableb WHERE aid = a.id)

GROUP BY a.id;

If you could have multiple failures for a day, and want to show the status as "1", then change this:

SUM(b1.status) latest_status

to:

MAX(b1.status) latest_status.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again, however that would still count the total overall failures and not only for the specific last failure. I guess I didnt explain it well enough. Each entry in A has a number of entries in B which are grouped by date. Each group is an individual data set. And here I now want to determine the most recent group overall (regardless of the status) and the most recent group with a SUM(status) larger than 0. –  user1616166 Aug 23 '12 at 16:34

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