Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From a previous question I learned something interesting. If Python's itertools.product is fed a series of iterators, these iterators will be converted into tuples before the Cartesian product begins. Related questions look at the source code of itertools.product to conclude that, while no intermediate results are stored in memory, tuple versions of the original iterators are created before the product iteration begins.

Question: Is there a way to create an iterator to a Cartesian product when the (tuple converted) inputs are too large to hold in memory? Trivial example:

import itertools
A = itertools.permutations(xrange(100))
itertools.product(A)

A more practical use case would take in a series of (*iterables[, repeat]) like the original implementation of the function - the above is just an example. It doesn't look like you can use the current implementation of itertools.product, so I welcome in submission in pure python (though you can't beat the C backend of itertools!).

share|improve this question
    
How do you propose that the products then are produced? You'd have to use .tee() which also caches iterators to do their job. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 23 '12 at 14:00
3  
Alternatively, you'd need re-startable iterators, e.g. you can only achieve your goal if you could somehow create each iterator a-new, to produce the exact same results as during the previous full run. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 23 '12 at 14:04
    
@MartijnPieters I'm not sure (hence the question!). The heart of the question is, give an outer product implementation without any intermediate storage. Possible in itertools, I'm not sure - in pure Python, I think it may be possible as we can "restart" an iterator by crating it fresh each time it is needed. –  Hooked Aug 23 '12 at 14:06
    
Exactly, but that would only work if you can guarantee the iterator will produce the same results each time you recreate it. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 23 '12 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's an implementation which calls callables and iterates iterables, which are assumed restartable:

def product(*iterables, **kwargs):
    if len(iterables) == 0:
        yield ()
    else:
        iterables = iterables * kwargs.get('repeat', 1)
        it = iterables[0]
        for item in it() if callable(it) else iter(it):
            for items in product(*iterables[1:]):
                yield (item, ) + items

Testing:

import itertools
g = product(lambda: itertools.permutations(xrange(100)),
            lambda: itertools.permutations(xrange(100)))
print next(g)
print sum(1 for _ in g)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't fully understand why the input to product has to be a lambda function, it still seems to work even if you use my A from the example. –  Hooked Aug 23 '12 at 15:04
    
@Hooked that'll work to start with, but once it reaches the end (in the inner loops) it won't know to restart the permutations. Try for a small range in A to see. –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 15:06
    
@Hooked: If we want recreatable iterators, you must pass the iterator creator to the product function. The iterators must only be created in the function itself. –  Jo So Aug 23 '12 at 15:07
    
I see now, didn't realize that it would be dangerous to do something like for x in product(lambda: A,repeat=2):, which gives the completely wrong answer as A gets used up. Great answer, thank you! –  Hooked Aug 23 '12 at 15:10

Without "iterator recreation", it may be possible for the first of the factors. But that would save only 1/n space (where n is the number of factors) and add confusion.

So the answer is iterator recreation. A client of the function would have to ensure that the creation of the iterators is pure (no side-effects). Like

def iterProduct(ic):
    if not ic:
        yield []
        return

    for i in ic[0]():
        for js in iterProduct(ic[1:]):
            yield [i] + js


# Test
x3 = lambda: xrange(3)
for i in iterProduct([x3,x3,x3]):
    print i
share|improve this answer
    
The call to len(ic) fails with my input A as object of type 'itertools.permutations' has no len(). If I'm not mistaken, you also can't access an iterator by indexing ic[0]. as __getitem__ is not implemented in general. –  Hooked Aug 23 '12 at 14:48
    
@Hooked: The call to len() is now away. ic should not be an iterator, it is just a fixed number of factors provided as a list (there might be a solution with varargs, or one more functional (x:xs = ...) one, but my python is quite old. –  Jo So Aug 23 '12 at 14:58
    
@DSM: if ic: is implicit in the second block. Try it out. –  Jo So Aug 23 '12 at 15:00
    
@JoSo: ah, you're right. I was working with my own modification of your original code, so the bug was only on my side. :^) –  DSM Aug 23 '12 at 15:02

This can't be done with standard Python generators, because some of the iterables must be cycled through multiple times. You have to use some kind of datatype capable of "reiteration." I've created a simple "reiterable" class and a non-recursive product algorithm. product should have more error-checking, but this is at least a first approach. The simple reiterable class...

class PermutationsReiterable(object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __iter__(self):
        return itertools.permutations(xrange(self.value))

And product iteslf...

def product(*reiterables, **kwargs):
    if not reiterables:
        yield ()
        return
    reiterables *= kwargs.get('repeat', 1)

    iterables = [iter(ri) for ri in reiterables]
    try:
        states = [next(it) for it in iterables]
    except StopIteration:
        # outer product of zero-length iterable is empty
        return
    yield tuple(states)

    current_index = max_index = len(iterables) - 1
    while True:
        try:
            next_item = next(iterables[current_index])
        except StopIteration:
            if current_index > 0:
                new_iter = iter(reiterables[current_index])
                next_item = next(new_iter)
                states[current_index] = next_item
                iterables[current_index] = new_iter
                current_index -= 1
            else:
                # last iterable has run out; terminate generator
                return
        else:
            states[current_index] = next_item
            current_index = max_index
            yield tuple(states)

Tested:

>>> pi2 = PermutationsReiterable(2)
>>> list(pi2); list(pi2)
[(0, 1), (1, 0)]
[(0, 1), (1, 0)]
>>> list(product(pi2, repeat=2))
[((0, 1), (0, 1)), ((0, 1), (1, 0)), ((1, 0), (0, 1)), ((1, 0), (1, 0))]
>>> giant_product = product(PermutationsReiterable(100), repeat=5)
>>> len(list(itertools.islice(giant_product, 0, 5)))
5
>>> big_product = product(PermutationsReiterable(10), repeat=2)
>>> list(itertools.islice(big_product, 0, 5))
[((0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)), 
 ((0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 8)), 
 ((0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7, 9)), 
 ((0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 7)), 
 ((0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 7, 8))]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the great answer. When you say "error-checking", what exactly would you look out for? Would it check to see if the iterator is restartable? How could you check for that? –  Hooked Aug 23 '12 at 15:21
    
That seems overly complicated and confusing, when a simple solution was already provided long before. Does this one do anything in a better way? –  Jo So Aug 23 '12 at 15:25
1  
Bug: product() should yield exactly one empty tuple. –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 15:50
1  
Also, you're not using repeat in the function. –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 15:51
1  
You fixed the wrong place! The yield () should go at the beginning. –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 15:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.