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I wrote a logging mechanism with several log levels.

LOG_FATAL(s)
LOG_ERROR(s)
LOG_WARN(s)
...

Now I want to be able to activate or deactivate the logging for some modules. What I do now:

#ifdef MOUDLE_LOG_ON
  MODULE_LOG_FATAL(s)  LOG_FATAL(s) 
  MODULE_LOG_ERROR(s)  LOG_ERROR(s)
  MODULE_LOG_WARN(s)   LOG_WARN(s)
  ...
#else
  MODULE_LOG_FATAL(s) 
  MODULE_LOG_ERROR(s)
  MODULE_LOG_WARN(s)
  ...
#endif

Is there a way to place the prefixing in a macro to use it like this:

SETUPLOGGING(MODULE) 
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I guess that this does not even compile. perhaps a #define would not go amiss –  Ed Heal Aug 23 '12 at 14:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am wondering if using macros and inline functions could solve your issue:

void inline LOG_FATAL(const char *s)
{
    printf("%s\n", s);
}

#define SETUPLOGGING(x) \
    void inline x ## _LOG_FATAL(const char *s) { LOG_FATAL(s); }

SETUPLOGGING(MODULE)

int main()
{
    MODULE_LOG_FATAL("hello");
}

After preprocessing, this produces:

void inline LOG_FATAL(const char *s)
{
 printf("%s\n", s);
}

void inline MODULE_LOG_FATAL(const char *s) { LOG_FATAL(s); }

int main()
{
 MODULE_LOG_FATAL("hello");
}
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Macros can't define new macros. And when defining a macro, it isn't possible to build its name from other macro, so you can't use the common work around of including a file which defines what you want.

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You could use a macro to define which include file you were going to use, but then, why not use an include file and use the macro in there?

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