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i am currently learning about javascript namespaces as i build a website and i have the following requirements: i want to make all of my code private so that other public scripts on the page (possibly adverts, i'm not too sure at this stage) cannot override or alter my javascript. the problem i am foreseeing is that the public scripts may use window.onload and i do not want them to override my private version of window.onload. i do still want to let them run window.onload though.

so far i have the following layout:

//public code not written by me - i'm thinking this will be executed first
window.onload = function() {
    document.getElementById('pub').onclick = function() {
        alert('ran a public event');
    };
};

//private code written by me
(function() {
    var public_onload = window.onload; //save the public for later use
    window.onload = function() {
        document.getElementById('priv').onclick = function() {
            a = a + 1
            alert('ran a private event. a is ' + a);
        };
    };
    if(public_onload) public_onload();
    var a = 1;
})();

i have quite a few questions about this...

firstly, is this a good structure for writing my javascript code, or is there a better one? (i'm planning on putting all of my code within the anonymous function). is my private code really private, or is there a way that the public javascript can access it? i'm guessing the answer to this is "yes - using tricky eval techniques. do not embed code you do not trust", but i'd like to know how this would be done if so.

secondly, when i click on the public link, the event is not fired. why is this?

finally, if i comment out the if(public_onload) public_onload(); line then a is returned correctly when i click the private button. but if i leave this line in then a's value is nan. why is this?

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can attach event listeners to avoid their overriding in some way like this:

<ol id="res"></ol>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var res = document.getElementById('res');

    function log(line) {
        var li = document.createElement('li');
        li.innerHTML = line;
        res.appendChild(li);
    }

    // global code:
    window.onload = function() {
        log('inside the global window.onload handler');
    };

    // private code:
    (function(window) {
        function addEvent(el, ev, fn) {
            if (el.addEventListener) {
                el.addEventListener(ev, fn, false);
            } else if (el.attachEvent) {
                el.attachEvent('on' + ev, fn);
            } else {
                el['on' + ev] = fn;
            }
        }
        addEvent(window, 'load', function() {
            log('inside the second window.onload handler in "private section"');
        });
    })(window); 
</script>​

DEMO

The example of code organization you asked about:

HTML:

<ol id="res"></ol>​

JavaScript:

/* app.js */

// in global scope:    
var MyApp = (function(app) {
    var res = document.getElementById('res');

    app.log = function(line) {
        var li = document.createElement('li');
        li.innerHTML = line;
        res.appendChild(li);
    };

    app.doWork = function() {
        app.log('doing a work');
    };

    return app;
})(MyApp || {});

/* my-app-module.js */

// again in global scope: 
var MyApp = (function(app) {

    app.myModule = app.myModule || {};

    app.myModule.doWork = function () {
        app.log('my module is doing a work');
    };

    return app;
})(MyApp || {});

/* somewhere after previous definitions: */

(function() {
    MyApp.doWork();
    MyApp.myModule.doWork();
})();

DEMO

MyApp is accessible from outside
Nothing is accessible from outside

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answers man. i didn't think of passing in the window object to the private 'module' in your first example. i guess i thought window would be global within the private module... in your second example of code organisation, i was hoping to keep my module completely inaccessible to the other public code - ie not readable or writable. would this simply mean changing (MyApp || {}) to () ? –  mulllhausen Aug 23 '12 at 23:16
    
If you'll change it so, then you'll not be able to extend your initial namespace in other files. Here in my example the MyApp variable is shared between modules and it provides a public interface to your application. –  Eugene Naydenov Aug 24 '12 at 7:14
    
ah i see. i plan on putting everything inside one "module" for the whole project anyway - with the hope of keeping it inaccessible. if i expose the MYApp object like this then couldn't other scripts write to MyApp and either prevent me from creating a method (if my code runs second) or overwrite some of my methods (if my code runs first)? –  mulllhausen Aug 24 '12 at 7:53
    
If you're not planning to use more than one module (.js file), you can use your approach with creating and calling an anonymous function without arguments. –  Eugene Naydenov Aug 24 '12 at 11:04
    
So if you'll use my approach, then the MyApp variable will be accessible outside and another code can override the properties of MyApp object. Say after your definition of MyApp = (function(app) { ... return app; other code can do something like MyApp.doWork = function() { alert('doing nothing! :P'); }; –  Eugene Naydenov Aug 24 '12 at 11:14
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