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I'm code reviewing a colleagues code and found this:

Header file:

template<class T>
class MyClass
{
  void Execute();
}

Cpp file:

void MyClass<int>::Execute()
{
  // something
}

void MyClass<string>::Execute()
{
  // something else
}

The code is specializing the function, but without using template specialization syntax. I guess it's working ok, but is it valid?

share|improve this question
    
Does it compile? – Kerrek SB Aug 23 '12 at 14:53
    
Yes. Visual Studio 2010. – Scott Langham Aug 23 '12 at 14:55
    
Apologies for any ambiguity in the original title of the question. – Scott Langham Aug 23 '12 at 15:05
    
BEWARE: If you specialize a member function like that, you can no long specialize the main template (this might or might not be an issue, but you are inhibiting all future specializations of the class template. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 23 '12 at 15:18
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is the old syntax for explicit specialization. But I'm surprised that you are using a compiler which still accept it (g++ stopped around 4.0). To be conforming you need to prefix the specialization with template <>.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it's perfectly valid to specialize methods of a template class.

But your syntax is wrong, it should be: (sorry, didn't see you were missing the template<> initially. Just assumed it was there and thought you were asking about member function specialization.)

template<>
void MyClass<int>::Execute()
{
  // something
}
template<>
void MyClass<string>::Execute()
{
  // something else
}

You need only declare these in the header. If you implement them in the header as well, you'll need to mark them inline to prevent multiple definition.

When calling a method, the version that suits the call most is called. Otherwise, the default.

In your case, if you specialize the template with a class X and attempt to call Execute, you'll get a linker error because you haven't provided a default implementation, nor a specialization for Execute for X.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you have misunderstood the question. Or I have. I think @ScottLangham is asking why there's no template<> before the definitions and is this completely valid? – Kiril Kirov Aug 23 '12 at 14:57
    
I don't think this is "specialisation" in the sense you mean. It's just "providing a definition". – Kerrek SB Aug 23 '12 at 14:58
    
@KirilKirov I missed that (didn't see the template<> missing). In that case, it's illegal. – Luchian Grigore Aug 23 '12 at 15:01
1  
After your edit, it's still important to stress the difference between having or not having a definition in the main template definition -- one is OK, the other violates the ODR. – Kerrek SB Aug 23 '12 at 15:02
    
@KerrekSB, it is a specialization. At least it is called so by B.S. in D&E (where he explains that a keyword specialize or specialise had been considered and rejected, so no prefix was needed yet at the time). – AProgrammer Aug 23 '12 at 15:07

The question has already been answered, but let me draw attention to subtle differences between three cases.

Case 1: Specialization

header:

template <typename T> struct Foo
{
    void f() { /* stuff */ }
};

template <> void Foo<int>::f();

source:

template <> void Foo<int>::f() { /* ... */ }

In this case, Foo<T>::f() can be called for any T. The definition for the general case is auto-generated from the template; the definition for Foo<int>::f() is the one provided. Having the specialization in the header alerts every consuming translation unit that a separate symbol is to be looked up, rather than to use the template.


Case 2: Definition

header:

template <typename T> struct Foo
{
    void f();
};

source:

template <> void Foo<int>::f() { /* ... */ }

In this case, only Foo<int>::f() can be used; everything else will cause a linker error. Since there is no definition of the function in the template, every use of the template will cause a new symbol to be emitted, and only the one for Foo<int>::f() is provided by the shown translation unit.


Case 3: Flagrant error

header:

template <typename T> struct Foo
{
    void f() { /* stuff */ }
};

source:

template <> void Foo<int>::f() { /* ... */ }

This is a violation of the one-definition rule, since there are now multiple definitions of Foo<int>::f().

share|improve this answer

To answer the question in the title as originally written: absolutely. It's also valid to have a completely unrelated set of members in a specialization.

To answer the question in the code: looks to me like a compiler bug. The template <> is required.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry... I over abbreviated the title. – Scott Langham Aug 23 '12 at 15:04

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