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I have following function :

  function a() {
    var d = {
      foo : "text"
    };
    for(var b in c) {
      if(c.hasOwnProperty(b)) {
        d[b] = function() {
          return c[b].apply(this, arguments);
        };
      }
    }
    return d;
  }

  var c = {
    a : function() { alert(this.foo); },
    b : function() { return this.a(); }
  }

  a().a(); // nothing happens

  // but the following works :
  var c = {
    a : function() { alert(this.foo); }
  }

  a().a(); // output : text

I think this happens because of this in the .apply method. How can I fix this?

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closed as too broad by Neal, tereško, rene, Qantas 94 Heavy, Wyzard Mar 2 at 20:52

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Oh god. Why would you write such a complicated behavior?! –  Florent Aug 23 '12 at 14:54
    
@Florent just to make life easier.... –  Neal Aug 23 '12 at 14:55
    
function a() will be used like 100 or 1000 times, so I don't want it to contain a lot of big functions, so I am trying to link somehow a().a() to c.a() without creating it each time in a() function. I can't create global functions because a lot of functions may be already defined by javascript. –  John Aug 23 '12 at 14:57
    
@Florent ^^ do you have a translator?! –  Neal Aug 23 '12 at 14:59
    
@Neal no, sorry... –  Florent Aug 23 '12 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not working because your iterator variable "b" in function "a" is shared by each of the closures.

Try this:

for(var b in c) {
  if(c.hasOwnProperty(b)) {
    d[b] = function(b) {
      return function() { return c[b].apply(this, arguments); };
    }(b);
  }
}

Here is the working version as a jsfiddle.

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thanks, it works now. –  John Aug 23 '12 at 15:16

a() executes in the global scope. When you call c[b].apply(this, arguments) it also executes in the global scope. The for loop iterates back-to-front, it comes across b first, it executes b in the global scope, which calls a in the global scope, which loops over c, which calls b in the global scope, ...

Result: RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

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That's not really accurate. The outer "a" returns an object with its own "a" property. Thus, a().a() will result in that inner function having the object returned from the first a() as its this reference. –  Pointy Aug 23 '12 at 15:08
    
Yeah, I noticed that myself after posting, but I figured adding another layer of indirection to the answer wasn't helping to clarify things. –  Joeri Sebrechts Aug 23 '12 at 15:11

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