Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question is about graphics::persp . I'm trying to figure out what order the values in the colors argument are applied to the facets. For example, I wanted to do something similar to the drape argument in lattice::wireframe , where the color is a function of the z-values. I tried a simple example:

gairy<- matrix(rep(1,61^2),nr=61)
gairy[20:40,20:40]<-10
fairy<- matrix(nc=61,nr=61)
fairy[,]<-rainbow(20)[gairy]
persp(gairy,col=fairy)

(hope this works -- limited choice of posting from work)
https://plus.google.com/photos/102564725150183579541/albums/5779881398012083153

But the color assignments show up in rather strange places. I'm pretty sure from this and other experiments that the colors are not applied in any row or column-ordered sequence. Can anyone shed some light on this, i.e. how to order my "colors" array to match the data?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

My suspicion is that the primary matrix passed to persp denotes the height of the nodes, while the colors refer to facets -- i.e. the dimensions of the color matrix should be one smaller than the dimensions of the node-height matrix. Recycling could give you weird-looking results.

For example, this looks reasonable:

persp(matrix(1:16,nrow=4),col=rainbow(9))
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you're correct -- first because it's consistent with that diagonal offset in my image, and second because changing to persp(gairy,col=fairy[1:60,1:60]) mapped the colors exactly right. Thanks! –  Carl Witthoft Aug 23 '12 at 17:04
    
I should also smack myself for reading the documentation to persp and ignoring the statement "This is recycled to the (nx-1)(ny-1) facets." –  Carl Witthoft Aug 23 '12 at 18:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.