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I really don't know how to word this question, so I'll give an example of what I'm trying to do.

I have a script where I need to use the sleep function for a few seconds. But before I go to "sleep" I need to have a message say for example "Sleeping... ". But after it's done sleeping, I need to print "done". So what the terminal window will look like would be something like this: Sleeping... done, and this is my code for that:

#!/usr/bin/perl

print "Sleeping... ";
sleep(1);
print "done";

But what happens is, the script sleeps, and it then outputs Sleeping... done all at once.

Is it possible to print "Sleeping... ", then actually go to "sleep", and finally print "done", but have everything on one line?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can enable auto flush on the file handle by setting $| to a non-zero value, such as:

local $| = 1;

So you're full script would be:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

local $| = 1;

print "Sleeping... ";
sleep(1);
print "done";

You can turn it back off by setting $| to 0, which you should do if this is just a small part of a larger script. Output is buffered by default for a reason.

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1  
It should also be noted that sleep is quite imprecise, with an error of +- 1sec. The Time::HiRes module can help if higher precision is neccessary. –  amon Aug 23 '12 at 15:49
    
Wow, that was a fast response. But thanks, it worked. Any reason why you used local? –  samwell Aug 23 '12 at 16:24
1  
Habit I guess. It's not needed. –  Sean Bright Aug 23 '12 at 16:25

Use

$| = 1

to disable buffered output. Then your script works as expected.

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1  
Far better, and more readable in modern code, is to use the form STDOUT->autoflush(1), rather than relying on the global punctuation vars. –  LeoNerd Aug 26 '12 at 11:25

Alternatives:

select()->autoflush();   # Same as:  $| = 1;
print "Sleeping... ";
sleep(1);
print "done\n";

print "Sleeping... ";
select()->flush();       # Same as:  my $saved = $|; $| = 1; $| = $saved;
sleep(1);
print "done\n";

(You can replace select() with STDOUT if you don't otherwise use select().)

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