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I need to do the following:

const char* my_var = "Something";
REGISTER(my_var);
const char* my_var2 = "Selse";
REGISTER(my_var2);
...
concst char* all[] = { OUTPUT_REGISTERED }; // inserts: "my_var1, my_var2, ..."

REGISTER and OUTPUT_REGISTERED are preprocesor macros. This would be great for large number of strings, like ~100. Is it possible to accomplish this?

PS. The code belongs to level-0 "block" – i.e. it is not inside any function. AFAIK, I cannot call regular functions there.

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6  
If you were writing C++ code, this would be trivial with a std::vector<std::string>. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 23 '12 at 15:52
    
There is no such thing as a "C++ preprocessor," is there? There's a C preprocessor supported by most C++ compilers, but you really shouldn't be using it; most of the things it used to do have been turned into checked language features. –  ssube Aug 23 '12 at 16:06
    
@peachykeen: There are many things that can only be done with the preprocessor. For example #define f(x,y) g(#x,x##y,__FILE__,__LINE__) –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 23 '12 at 16:08
    
@AndrewTomazos-Fathomling Absolutely, but this is not one of those, and I was trying not to muddy up the point (that you shouldn't use the preprocessor for this, or a lot of other things). –  ssube Aug 23 '12 at 16:10
    
@peachykeen: If you want to build a list like this with something of the form REGISTER(x); at global scope - than I think it is only possible with preprocessor. –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 23 '12 at 16:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<const char*>& all()
{
    static vector<const char*> v;
    return v;
}

struct string_register
{
    string_register(const char* s)
    {
        all().push_back(s);
    }
};

#define REGISTER3(x,y,sr) string_register sr ## y(x)
#define REGISTER2(x,y) REGISTER3(x,y,sr)
#define REGISTER(x) REGISTER2(x, __COUNTER__)

REGISTER("foo");
REGISTER("bar");

int main()
{
}
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Why the struct with only a push-on-create? Seems like if you're going to do that, providing a getter or updater would be nice (the question doesn't require them), and if not, you could just make the macro push. What's the advantage of the struct? –  ssube Aug 23 '12 at 16:09
    
@peachykeen: You can't execute a function at global scope. This builds the list during static initialization, so on entry to main it is ready. –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 23 '12 at 16:10
    
Oh, with the function. Somehow missed that. Makes perfect sense now. :) –  ssube Aug 23 '12 at 16:11
    
There is a problem with the _ COUNTER_. I tried also _ LINE_, and still "redefinition of sr__LINE__" –  AllCoder Aug 23 '12 at 16:29
    
@AllCoder: Fixed. –  Andrew Tomazos Aug 23 '12 at 16:42

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