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I'm new to programming and am trying to figure out the purpose of "initialize" in creating a class.

Here's an example:

class Person
  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
    @pet = nil
    @home = 'NYC'
  end
end

So initializing is to create a bunch of attributes that I can pull out directly by saying Person.name and Person.pet and Person.home right? Is "initialize" just to compact a bunch of variables into one place? Would I accomplish the same thing doing this:

class Person     
  pet = nil    
  home = 'NYC'    
  #not so sure how to replicate the @name here.    
end

Wouldn't I be able to access the values with Person.pet and Person.home the same way as I would in the first code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a little tricky in Ruby (as opposed to, say, Java) since both classes and instances of classes are actual objects at runtime. As such, a class has its own set of variables, and each instance of that class also gets its own set of variables (distinct from the class's variables).

When you say

class Person
  pet = nil
end

You're setting a variable, pet, which is local only to the class object called Person.

The way to manipulate the variables of an instance of a class is to use the variables in methods:

class Person
  def initialize
    pet = nil
  end
end

Here, pet refers to a local variable of a given instance of Person. Of course, this pet variable is pretty useless as defined, since it's just a local variable that goes away after the initialize function completes. The way to make this variable persist for the lifetime of the instance is to make it an instance variable, which you accomplish by prefixing it with a @. And thus we arrive at your first initialize:

class Person
  def initialize
    @pet = nil
    # And so on
  end
end

So, as to why you need initialize. Since the only way to set the instance variables of instances of Person is within methods of Person, this initialization needs to be in some method. initialize is just the convenient name for a method which is automatically called when your instance is first created.

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Beautiful. I understand it now. Thanks!!!! –  Edmund Aug 23 '12 at 16:22
    
Yes, best explanation I've heard in 6 years doing ruby –  marflar Aug 23 '12 at 16:29

Initialize is a method usually referred as an object constructor. It is used when you call Person.new("Bob") and it will give you an instance of that Person object. The @ symbol you see before the variables in the initialize makes the variable an instance variable meaning that variable will only be accessed once you have an instance of that object and it will stay there for the lifetime of that instance.

For example

person = Person.new("Bob")
person.name #Will output Bob
person.home #Will output NYC

Classes are objects and doing this:

class Person
  pet = nil
  home = 'NYC'
end

is just creating local variables pet and home and will be outside of the scope of the class. This means calling Person.pet and Person.home will just give you an error. I would suggest do a little reading on Object Oriented Programming (OOP) and if you have any more questions throw them in stackoverflow :D

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Correct me if I'm wrong: in order to access the variables like he describes, he will need the attr_accessor method in the body of the class definition, yes? –  Paul Richter Aug 23 '12 at 16:09
    
so while functions can be defined similarly to how I just defined variables (freely without initialize), self calling variables need to be defined within initialize? –  Edmund Aug 23 '12 at 16:11
    
@Edmund, Not necessarily. Ruby is a pretty loose, dynamic language in that you can define an instance variable in any function of the class at any time. So for example: def doStuff @ newVar = "yay" end –  Paul Richter Aug 23 '12 at 16:12
    
@Teeg I just tried what you're talking about. Yeh, I typed attr_accessor :home and then tried puts person.home, but it was empty. So I'm guessing even though person is an instance of Class Person, when variables are defined openly like that their values don't get inherited by the instance. I had to add a line person.home = 'LA' in order to receive a value for person.home when printing it –  Edmund Aug 23 '12 at 16:15
    
@Teeg so the @newVar = "yay" (assume it's in the class Person) be accessible if I type `person.doStuff.newVar ? –  Edmund Aug 23 '12 at 16:17

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