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I wrote a program designed to create a randomish list of numbers from a given starting point. It was a quick a dirty thing but I found an interesting effect when playing with it that I don't quite understand.

void Main()
{
    List<int> foo = new List<int>(){1,2,3};
    IEnumerable<int> bar = GetNumbers(foo);
    for (int i = 1; i < 3; i++)
    {
        foo = new List<int>(){1,2,3};
        var wibble = GetNumbers(foo);
        bar = bar.Concat(wibble);
    }
    Iterate(bar);
    Iterate(bar);
}

public void Iterate(IEnumerable<int> numbers)
{
    Console.WriteLine("iterating");
    foreach(int number in numbers)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(number);
    }
}

public IEnumerable<int> GetNumbers(List<int> input)
{
    //This function originally did more but this is a cutdown version for testing.
    while (input.Count>0)
    {
        int returnvalue = input[0];
        input.Remove(input[0]);
        yield return returnvalue;
    }
}

The output of runing this is:

iterating
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
iterating

That is to say the second time I iterate through bar immediately after it is empty.

I assume this is something to do with the fact that the first time I iterate that it empties the lists that are being used to generate the list and subsequently it is using these same lists that are now empty to iterate.

My confusion is on why this is happening? Why do my IEnumerables not start from their default state each time I enumerate over them? Can somebody explain what exactly I'm doing here?

And to be clear I know that I can solve this problem by adding a .ToList() to my call to GetNumbers() which forces immediate evaluation and storage of the results.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your iterator does start from its initial state. However, it modifies the list it's reading from, and once the list is cleared, your iterator doesn't have anything left to do. Basically, consider

var list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
var enumerable = list.Where(i => i != 2);
foreach (var item in enumerable)
    Console.WriteLine(item);
list.Clear();
foreach (var item in enumerable)
    Console.WriteLine(item);

enumerable doesn't get changed by list.Clear();, but the results it gives do.

share|improve this answer
    
For some reason I expected it to work on a copy of the list so it could keep its initial state pristine and unchanged for secondary runs. I guess it makes sense that it doesn't do anything complicated like that. And with respect to your example I understand that one, I just thought that mine was different because the list is inside the enumerator. Maybe I need to look at what is actually generated byt eh compiler for that method... – Chris Aug 23 '12 at 16:15
    
It's basically the same thing, because it doesn't matter who removes items from the list, it only matters that they're already removed before starting your second foreach. No new list is created if you don't say a new list should be created, even if it would be useful for your specific scenario. – hvd Aug 23 '12 at 16:21
    
Yup. I think I got it now. I was forgetting basics of programming it seems thinking something mroe clever was happening. So basically the iterators created do all have a private field storing the list but its a reference to the same list so removing on one removes it on subsequent. – Chris Aug 23 '12 at 16:26
    
I've realised that what I expected to happen after your comments and some starting at decompiled version of the code is what would have happened if I'd put var bang = new List<int>(input); at the beginning of my enumerable method so that it would always store a new copy of the thing on each loop. I think I understand now why it didn't though. Thanks for the help. :) – Chris Aug 23 '12 at 16:34

Your observation can be reproduced with this shorter version of the main method:

void Main() 
{ 
    List<int> foo = new List<int>(){1,2,3}; 
    IEnumerable<int> bar = GetNumbers(foo); 
    Console.WriteLine(foo.Count); // prints 3
    Iterate(bar); 
    Console.WriteLine(foo.Count); // prints 0
    Iterate(bar); 
} 

What happens is the following:

When you call GetNumbers it isn't really being executed. It will only be executed when you iterate over the result. You can verify this by putting Console.WriteLine(foo.Count); between the call to GetNumbers and Iterate.
On the first call to Iterate, GetNumbers is executed and empties foo. On the second call to Iterate, GetNumbers is executed again, but now foo is empty, so there is nothing left to return.

share|improve this answer

Well, the lazy evaluation is what hit you. You see, when you create a yield return-style method, it's not executed immediately upon call. It'll be however executed as soon as you iterate over the sequence.

So, this means that the list won't be cleared during GetNumbers, but only during Iterate. In fact, the whole body of the function GetNumbers will be executed only during Iterate.

You problem is that you made your IEnumersbles depend not only on inner state, but on outer state as well. That outer state is the content of foo lists.

So, the all the lists are filled until you Iterate the first time. (The IEnumerable created by GetNumbers holds a reference to them, so the fact that you overwrite foo doesn't matter.) All the three are emptied during the first Iterate. Next, the next iteration starts with the same inner state, but changed outer state, giving different result.

I'd like to notice, that mutation and depending on outer state is generally frowned upon in functional programming style. The LINQ is actually a step toward functional programming, so it's a good idea to follow the FP's rules. So you could do better with just not removing the items from input in GetNumbers.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I figured it was lazy evaluating, I think that and other clever things blinded me to the more simple problem that the iterator object only has a single copy of the list and that my problem was modifying that list in the method. – Chris Aug 23 '12 at 16:30

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