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I am currently trying out the process of test-driven development on a hobby project and while I do understand the concept (write your unit test first, watch it fail, make it work, refactor your code) I still have some questions.

The project I am working on is a MUD-client in Python. Right now I am busy with implementing the telnet protocol. (I know there is already a telnetlib in Python or an implementation in Twisted, but that's not the point)

Right now I have a class TelnetHandler that implements the Telnet protocol (or at least parts of it) and various unit tests for it. Since they're rather large they are on pastebin: TelnetHandler and the unit tests

My issues now are the following:

  • A lot of tests depend on each other: for instance if the test_handle_read tests fails then a lot of other tests will fail too.
  • In the TelnetOptionsTests I add methods that my class is supposed to call to just check if they were called (the various local_option_enabled methods). Now, I don't have those methods in my class. Should I add unit tests just to check their presence?
  • When I started writing my test I changed the handle_read method to also parse telnet commands. Afterwards, once I had my tests done I split the handle_read in various _handle_do, _handle_dont, etc... But I don't have unit tests for those as they're being tested in the original handle_read. Is this the proper way, or is it good practice to write unit tests also when you split a method in different methods?

Basically, what I am asking is various hints and pointers that can help me improve my unit testing skills.

Thank you!

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The whole point of UnitTests is to reduce the scope of the system under test to a small subset that can be tested in isolation. –  Alfred Aug 24 '12 at 15:21

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

A lot of tests depend on each other: for instance if the test_handle_read tests fails then a lot of other tests will fail too.

Don't do this. At the start of each test throw the world away and re-create it the way it should be for that test to run.

When I started writing my test I changed the handle_read method to also parse telnet commands. Afterwards, once I had my tests done I split the handle_read in various _handle_do, _handle_dont, etc... But I don't have unit tests for those as they're being tested in the original handle_read. Is this the proper way, or is it good practice to write unit tests also when you split a method in different methods?

It depends. When you split did you split into different public methods, or are they private methods that handle the implementation.

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To give an example, test_will_do: there I test what happens when the remote end answers with a specific answer. If the test_handle_read already fails, then that means that all reading from the socket will fail. Should I test, with every test, how handle_read works together with what I want to test? I tried to make tests only test one specific thing. As for the splitting: I did split it in private methods. –  Mew Aug 24 '12 at 16:52
    
so 'test_will_do' is not failing because 'handle_read' fails be because something is broken in your code? You can use something like "Assert.Inconclusive" (C#) to do validation before starting the real test. I would not test private methods directly. –  mlk Aug 28 '12 at 8:09
    
Thanks for help! Makes a bit more sense now. –  Mew Aug 28 '12 at 17:34

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