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When compiling with gcc -O3, why does the following loop not vectorize (automatically):

#define SIZE (65536)

int a[SIZE], b[SIZE], c[SIZE];

int foo () {
  int i, j;

  for (i=0; i<SIZE; i++){
    for (j=i; j<SIZE; j++) {
      a[i] = b[i] > c[j] ? b[i] : c[j];
    }
  }
  return a[0];
}

when the following one does?

#define SIZE (65536)

int a[SIZE], b[SIZE], c[SIZE];

int foov () {
  int i, j;

  for (i=0; i<SIZE; i++){
    for (j=i; j<SIZE; j++) {
      a[i] += b[i] > c[j] ? b[i] : c[j];
    }
  }
  return a[0];
}

The only difference is whether the result of the expression in the inner loop is assigned to a[i], or added to a[i].

For reference -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=6 gives the following output for the first (non-vectorizing) loop.

v.c:8: note: not vectorized: inner-loop count not invariant.
v.c:9: note: Unknown alignment for access: c
v.c:9: note: Alignment of access forced using peeling.
v.c:9: note: not vectorized: live stmt not supported: D.2700_5 = c[j_20];

v.c:5: note: vectorized 0 loops in function.

And the same output for the loop that vectorizes is:

v.c:8: note: not vectorized: inner-loop count not invariant.
v.c:9: note: Unknown alignment for access: c
v.c:9: note: Alignment of access forced using peeling.
v.c:9: note: vect_model_load_cost: aligned.
v.c:9: note: vect_model_load_cost: inside_cost = 1, outside_cost = 0 .
v.c:9: note: vect_model_simple_cost: inside_cost = 1, outside_cost = 1 .
v.c:9: note: vect_model_reduction_cost: inside_cost = 1, outside_cost = 6 .
v.c:9: note: cost model: prologue peel iters set to vf/2.
v.c:9: note: cost model: epilogue peel iters set to vf/2 because peeling for alignment is unknown .
v.c:9: note: Cost model analysis:
  Vector inside of loop cost: 3
  Vector outside of loop cost: 27
  Scalar iteration cost: 3
  Scalar outside cost: 7
  prologue iterations: 2
  epilogue iterations: 2
  Calculated minimum iters for profitability: 8

v.c:9: note:   Profitability threshold = 7

v.c:9: note: Profitability threshold is 7 loop iterations.
v.c:9: note: LOOP VECTORIZED.
v.c:5: note: vectorized 1 loops in function.
share|improve this question
    
What happens if you move the int j declaration inside the outer i loop? –  Josh Petitt Aug 23 '12 at 17:07
    
What version GCC is this? x86 or x64? I'm unable to repro this on my 32-bit OS. About to boot up my other machine to test it. –  Mysticial Aug 23 '12 at 17:22
    
gcc --version gives "gcc (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.1-9ubuntu3) 4.6.1 C", and uname -a gives "Linux ubuntu-dev 3.0.0-12-virtual #20-Ubuntu SMP Fri Oct 7 18:19:02 UTC 2011 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux" –  laslowh Aug 23 '12 at 17:25
    
Josh, it apparently does not matter where j is declared, same result. –  laslowh Aug 23 '12 at 17:26
    
There we go, managed to repro it. It had to be x64. –  Mysticial Aug 23 '12 at 17:29
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4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

In the first case: the code overwrites the same memory location a[i] in each iteration. This inherently sequentializes the loop as the loop iterations are not independent.
(In reality, only the final iteration is actually needed. So the entire inner loop could be taken out.)

In the second case: GCC recognizes the loop as a reduction operation - for which it has special case handling to vectorize.

Compiler vectorization is often implemented as some sort of "pattern matching". Meaning the compiler analyzes code to see if it fits a certain pattern that it's able to vectorize. If it does, it gets vectorized. If it doesn't, then it doesn't.

This seems to be a corner case where the first loop doesn't fit any of the pre-coded patterns that GCC can handle. But the second case fits the "vectorizable reduction" pattern.


Here's the relevant part of GCC's source code that spits out that "not vectorized: live stmt not supported: " message:

http://svn.open64.net/svnroot/open64/trunk/osprey-gcc-4.2.0/gcc/tree-vect-analyze.c

if (STMT_VINFO_LIVE_P (stmt_info))
{
    ok = vectorizable_reduction (stmt, NULL, NULL);

    if (ok)
        need_to_vectorize = true;
    else
        ok = vectorizable_live_operation (stmt, NULL, NULL);

    if (!ok)
    {
        if (vect_print_dump_info (REPORT_UNVECTORIZED_LOOPS))
        {
            fprintf (vect_dump, 
                "not vectorized: live stmt not supported: ");
            print_generic_expr (vect_dump, stmt, TDF_SLIM);
        }
        return false;
    }
}

From just the line:

vectorizable_reduction (stmt, NULL, NULL);

It's clear that GCC is checking to see if it matches a "vectorizable reduction" pattern.

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you find gcc is able to vectorize the first case with the (largely redundant) inner loop replaced with the final iteration? –  ecatmur Aug 23 '12 at 18:25
1  
Yep. It's able to vectorize it. :) It took me a while to notice the redundancy. I kinda jumped straight to the metal when I saw the question and overlooked the obvious. –  Mysticial Aug 23 '12 at 18:27
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GCC vectorizer is probably not smart enough to vectorize the first loop. The addition case is easier to vectorize because a + 0 == a. Consider SIZE==4:

  0 1 2 3 i
0 X
1 X X
2 X X X
3 X X X X
j

X denotes the combinations of i and j when a will be assigned to or increased. For the case of addition, we can compute the results of b[i] > c[j] ? b[i] : c[j] for, say, j==1 and i==0..4 and put it into vector D. Then we only need to zero D[2..3] and add resulting vector to a[0..3]. For the case of assignment, it is a little more trickier. We must not only zero D[2..3], but also zero A[0..1] and only then combine the results. I guess this is where the vectorizer is failing.

share|improve this answer
    
I think, making a volatile should solve this. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 23 '12 at 17:40
1  
Of course not. Then the vectorizer would have ensure that all stores and loads happen in the same order as in non vectorized loop. In fact, adding volatile makes GCC not to vectorize the second loop too. –  user283145 Aug 23 '12 at 17:45
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The first loop is equivalent to

#define SIZE (65536)

int a[SIZE], b[SIZE], c[SIZE];

int foo () {
  int i, j;

  for (i=0; i<SIZE; i++){
    a[i] = b[i] > c[SIZE - 1] ? b[i] : c[SIZE - 1];
  }
  return a[0];
}

The problem with the original expression is that it really doesn't make that much sense, so it's not too surprising gcc isn't able to vectorize it.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Compilers generally suck at optimizing "poor" code. Having entire redundant loops is one of such examples. –  Mysticial Aug 23 '12 at 18:31
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First one just trivially changing a[] many times(temporary). Second one uses the last value of a[] each time(not temporary).

Until a version of patch, you could use "volatile" variable to vectorize.

Use

int * c=malloc(sizeof(int));

to make it aligned;

v.c:9: note: Unknown alignment for access: c

Shows "c" having different storage area than b and a.

I assume "movaps"-like instructions for being "vectorized" (from SSE-AVX instruction list)

Here: http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/tree-ssa/vectorization.html#using

the 6th and 7th examples show similar difficulties.

share|improve this answer
1  
Both versions suffer from unknown alignment. So I doubt that's the case. –  Mysticial Aug 23 '12 at 17:15
1  
@Mystical is correct, please see additional output added to the question above. –  laslowh Aug 23 '12 at 17:23
    
@laslowh: ok, i am adding things. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 23 '12 at 17:24
    
what is new ?) does it return something compatible to int ? –  Jens Gustedt Aug 23 '12 at 18:12
    
0_o. ok. fixing. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 23 '12 at 18:13
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