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I was writing a (seemingly) straight-forward SQL snippet that drops a column after it makes sure the column exists.
The problem: if the column does NOT exist, the code inside the IF clause complains that it can't find the column! Well, doh, that's why it's inside the IF clause!
So my question is, why does a piece of code that shouldn't be executed give errors?

Here's the snippet:

IF exists (select * from syscolumns
    WHERE id=object_id('Table_MD') and name='timeout')
BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Table_MD]
        DROP COLUMN timeout
END
GO

...and here's the error:

Error executing SQL script [...]. Invalid column name 'timeout'

I'm using Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted
IF exists (select * from syscolumns
    WHERE id=object_id('Table_MD') and name='timeout')
BEGIN
    DECLARE @SQL nvarchar(1000)
    SET @SQL = N'ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Table_MD] DROP COLUMN timeout'
    EXEC sp_executesql @SQL
END
GO

Reason: When Sql server compiles the code, they check it for used objects ( if they exists ). This check procedure ignores any "IF", "WHILE", etc... constructs and simply check all used objects in code.

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Correct. You will also get this error if there are temporary tables lying around that the sproc uses. –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Sep 23 '08 at 13:35
    
To clarify, if a temporary table exists then the columns will be checked when you compile the sproc. Where the sproc actually creates the table (for example with a select into) you may need to drop the table before recompiling the sproc. –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Sep 23 '08 at 13:36
    
This is a very good answer :) –  Ed Schwehm Sep 23 '08 at 18:37

It may never be executed, but it's parsed for validity by Sql Server. The only way to "get around" this is to construct a block of dynamic sql and then selectively execute it

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Here's how I got it to work:

Inside the IF clause, I changed the ALTER ... DROP ... command with exec ('ALTER ... DROP ...')

It seems the SQL server does a validity check on the code when parsing it, and sees that a non-existing column gets referenced somewhere (even if that piece of code will never be executed).
Using the exec(ute) command wraps the problematic code in a string, the parser doesn't complain, and the code only gets executed when necessary. Here's the modified snippet:

IF exists (select * from syscolumns
    WHERE id=object_id('Table_MD') and name='timeout')
BEGIN
    exec ('ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Table_MD] DROP COLUMN timeout')
END
GO
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By the way, there is a similar issue in Oracle, and a similar workaround using the "execute immediate" clause.

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