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I'm looking for an easy way to compare two similar strings and output the difference for instance if I have

"abcdefghijklmnop" and "abcdefghi"

the function would output

"jklmnop"

I need to know how to do this in both php and python

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closed as too broad by Wooble, Clockwork-Muse, Emissary, Mike Kinghan, Jk1 May 25 at 12:48

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
why was this downvoted? –  Tom Haigh Jul 30 '09 at 22:45
3  
because people answer to you but you dont mark anyone as the right answer –  yossi Jun 6 '11 at 10:01
4  
-1 If you want to know in both languages, open multiple questions. You aren't necessarily going to get any constructive answers that answer both languages. –  Anthony Sottile Aug 10 '12 at 23:20
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9 Answers

Python has the difflib module in its standard library that can be used to do this.

import difflib

s1 = "abcdefghijklmnop"
s2 = "abcdefghi"
s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(a=s1, b=s2)
for block in s.get_matching_blocks():
    print "match at a[%d] and b[%d] of length %d" % block

difflib is very powerful and has many different ways of searching for differences. Some study of the documentation would be worthwhile if you choose to use this.

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12  
Because in Python, it really is simply a case of typing "import antigravity"! –  Sean Vieira Jul 30 '09 at 22:58
    
I think it should be noted that difflib in this case is only approximate match. I had a case when two string differed in a single position and this was not picked up by the SequenceMatcher. –  petr Aug 1 '12 at 10:59
    
for example: s1 = "MDVFMKGLSKAKEGVVAAAEKTKQGVAEAAGKTKEGVLYVGSKTKEGVVHGVATVAEKTKEQVTNVGGAVVTGVTAVAQ‌​KTVEGAGSIAAATGFVKKDQLGKNEEGAPQEGILEDMPVDPDNEAYEMPSEEGYQDYEPEA"; s2 = "MDVFMKGLSKAKEGVVAAAEKTKQGVAEAAGKTKEGVLYVGSKTKEGVVQGVATVAEKTKEQVTNVGGAVVTGVTAVAQ‌​KTVEGAGSIAAATGFVKKDQLGKNEEGAPQEGILEDMPVDPDNEAYEMPSEEGYQDYEPEA", following input does not show any difference using difflib despite the position 49 being different between those two strings –  petr Aug 1 '12 at 11:15
    
@petr: I found that my example code was incorrect (I've fixed it now). In the SequenceMatcher constructor, the first parameter is actually a filter function. Using the keyword arguments a= and b= fixes that problem, and detects the difference in your two strings correctly. Thanks! –  Greg Hewgill Aug 1 '12 at 19:44
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In Python, you can do:

x = "abcdefghijklmnop"
y = x.replace("abcdefghi", "")

# y now equals "jklmnop"
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3  
This only works if one is a substring of the other –  endolith Apr 29 '11 at 15:59
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In PHP. array_diff compares the first against the second array and returns the difference.

$a1 = str_split('abcdefghijklmnop');
$a2 = str_split('abcdefghi');

echo join('', array_diff($a1, $a2)); // jklmnop

This will work as well.

$s1 = 'abcdefghijklmnop';
$s2 = 'abcdefghi';

echo str_replace(str_split($s2), '', $s1); // jklmnop

This could handle $s2 = 'ghiabcdef'; as well because str_replace() is fed with an array, not a string.

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If you are sure that first string always starts with second string, you can do by this way:

>>> s1 = "abcdefghijklmnop"
>>> s2 = "abcdefghi"
>>> s1[len(s2):]
'jklmnop'
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2  
You can check for your assumption with s1.startswith(s2). –  Bengt Nov 29 '12 at 23:41
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(1) use short string as separator to split long string, get a list of diff strings. (2) join the list.

Python

s1 = "abcdefghijklmnop"
s2 = "abcdefghi"
diffs = s1.split(s2) if len(s1) > len(s2) else s2.split(s1)
print "".join(diffs) # "jklmnop"

PHP

s2 = "abcdefghijklmnop";
$s1 = "abcdefghi";

$diffs = NULL;
if (strlen($s1) > strlen($s2)) {
    $diffs = explode($s2, $s1);
} else {
    $diffs = explode($s1, $s2);
}
print implode("", $diffs); // "jklmnop"
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In php try this code

<?php
$splitted_array = explode("abcdefghi","abcdefghijklmnop");
foreach($splitted_array as $fetched_value){
echo $fetched_value;
}
?>
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Another interesting function in PHP is levenshtein($a,$b). This can be good for calculating close strings.

$strings=array("apples","tomato","research","tree"); //strings to test
$test="apple"; //string to compare
$min=100; //any big value
$value="";
foreach($strings as $string) {
     $lev=levenshtein($string,$test);
     if($lev<$min) { //if a closer string than the current closest is found
          $min=$lev;
          $value=$string;
     }
}
echo($value); // "apples", the closest to "apple"

Full documentation can be found here.

An alternate method could be with regular expressions. For example, in Python,

import re # regular expression library
print(re.sub(r'[abcdefghi]', # selects all characters in this set
          '', # and removes them
          'abcdefghijklmnop')) # test string
# prints "jklmnop"

All the other answers work too. Hope that helps!

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In Python:

>>> s1 = 'abcdefghijklmnop'
>>> s2 = 'abcdefghi'
>>> set(s1) - set(s2)
set(['k', 'j', 'm', 'l', 'o', 'n', 'p'])
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2  
This implies that there's only one occurrence of each letter in each string. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 30 '09 at 23:02
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>>> s1 = "abcdefghijklmnop"
>>> s2 = "abcdefghi"
>>> s1.strip(s2)
'jklmnop'
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3  
This only works if s2 is at the beginning or end. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 30 '09 at 22:50
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