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I've been trying to fix this crash for almost a week. The application crashes without any exception or stack-trace. The application does not crash in any way while running through instruments in zombie mode.

I have a method that gets called on a different thread. The solution that fixed the crash was replacing

[self.mutableArray removeAllObjects];

with

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
    [self.searchResult removeAllObjects];
});

I thought it might be a timing issue, so I tried to synchronize it, but it still crashed:

@synchronized(self)
{
    [self.searchResult removeAllObjects];
}

Here is the code

- (void)populateItems
{
   // Cancel if already exists  
   [self.searchThread cancel];

   self.searchThread = [[NSThread alloc] initWithTarget:self
                                               selector:@selector(populateItemsinBackground)
                                                 object:nil];

    [self.searchThread start];
}


- (void)populateItemsinBackground
{
    @autoreleasepool
    {
        if ([[NSThread currentThread] isCancelled])
            [NSThread exit];

        [self.mutableArray removeAllObjects];

        // Populate data here into mutable array

        for (loop here)
        {
            if ([[NSThread currentThread] isCancelled])
                [NSThread exit];

            // Add items to mutableArray
        }
    }
}

Is this problem with NSMutableArray not being thread-safe?

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1  
One @synchronized block by itself wouldn't do anything. You need a lock (which is what @sychronized provides) around every access to the array. –  Josh Caswell Aug 23 '12 at 18:43
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6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

No.

It is not thread safe and if you need to modify your mutable array from another thread you should use NSLock to ensure everything goes as planned:

NSLock *arrayLock = [[NSLock alloc] init];

[...] 

[arrayLock lock]; // NSMutableArray isn't thread-safe
[myMutableArray addObject:@"something"];
[myMutableArray removeObjectAtIndex:5];
[arrayLock unlock];
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7  
You need to do that and protect every read with the same lock as well. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 23 '12 at 18:55
1  
Is this necessary if the @property is declared without the nonatomic specifier? –  Mark Adams Aug 23 '12 at 19:01
    
It all depends on the implementation of the getter/setter or not due to @synthesize, check out this post: stackoverflow.com/a/589392/662605 –  Daniel Aug 23 '12 at 19:06
1  
How did you do that? You surrounded the removeAllObjects by the lock? Where is your lock initialised ? –  Daniel Aug 23 '12 at 20:38
2  
yes you should initialise the lock from the thread the object you want locking is initialised. Try putting the lock next to where you initialise your array, and make it an ivar –  Daniel Aug 23 '12 at 21:23
show 5 more comments

As others already said, NSMutableArray is not thread safe. In case anyone want to achieve more than removeAllObject in a thread-safe environment, I will give another solution using GCD besides the one using lock. What you have to do is to synchronize the read/update(replace/remove) actions.

First get the global concurrent queue:

dispatch_queue_t concurrent_queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);

For read:

- (id)objectAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index {
    __block id obj;
    dispatch_sync(self.concurrent_queue, ^{
        obj = [self.searchResult objectAtIndex:index];
    });
    return obj;
}

For insert:

- (void)insertObject:(id)obj atIndex:(NSUInteger)index {
    dispatch_barrier_async(self.concurrent_queue, ^{
        [self.searchResult insertObject:obj atIndex:index];
    });
}

From Apple Doc about dispatch_barrier_async:

When the barrier block reaches the front of a private concurrent queue, it is not executed immediately. Instead, the queue waits until its currently executing blocks finish executing. At that point, the barrier block executes by itself. Any blocks submitted after the barrier block are not executed until the barrier block completes.

Similar for remove:

- (void)removeObjectAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index {
    dispatch_barrier_async(self.concurrent_queue, ^{
        [self.searchResult removeObjectAtIndex:index];
    });
}

EDIT: Actually I found another simpler way today to synchronize access to a resource by using a serial queue provided by GCD.

From Apple Doc Concurrency Programming Guide > Dispatch Queues:

Serial queues are useful when you want your tasks to execute in a specific order. A serial queue executes only one task at a time and always pulls tasks from the head of the queue. You might use a serial queue instead of a lock to protect a shared resource or mutable data structure. Unlike a lock, a serial queue ensures that tasks are executed in a predictable order. And as long as you submit your tasks to a serial queue asynchronously, the queue can never deadlock.

Create your serial queue:

dispatch_queue_t myQueue = dispatch_queue_create("com.example.MyQueue", NULL);

Dispatch tasks async to the serial queue:

dispatch_async(myQueue, ^{
    obj = [self.searchResult objectAtIndex:index];
});

dispatch_async(myQueue, ^{
    [self.searchResult removeObjectAtIndex:index];
});

Hope it helps!

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Using gcd might cause problems. What if the value is expected to be removed/added to an error before the end of the runloop? –  aryaxt Feb 18 at 2:25
    
Just perform all operations on the same serial queue. –  gnasher729 Feb 18 at 23:55
    
Serial queue is of course solution, but reading from collections of any kind is thread-safe. Parallel reading and barrier modifications are perfectly fine. –  iMartin May 2 at 20:10
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As well as NSLock can also use @synchronized(condition-object) you just have to make sure every access of the array is wrapped in a @synchronized with the same object acting as the condition-object , if you only want to modify the contents of the same array instance then you can use the array itself as the condition-object, other wise you will have to use something else you know will not go away, the parent object, ie self, is a good choice because it will always be the same one for the same array.

atomic in @property attributes will only make setting the array thread safe not modifying the contents, i.e. self.mutableArray = ... is thread safe but [self.mutableArray removeObject:] is not.

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Since serial queues were mentioned: With a mutable array, just asking "is it thread safe" isn't enough. For example, making sure that removeAllObjects doesn't crash is all good and fine, but if another thread tries to process the array at the same time, it will either process the array before or after all elements are removed, and you really have to think what the behaviour should be.

Creating one class + object that is responsible for this array, creating a serial queue for it, and doing all operations through the class on that serial queue is the easiest way to get things right without making your brain hurt through synchronisation problems.

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Almost NSMutable classes object is not thread safe.

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__weak typeof(self)weakSelf = self;

 @synchronized (weakSelf.mutableArray) {
     [weakSelf.mutableArray removeAllObjects];
 }

This amazing article will explain it all:

http://refactr.com/blog/2012/10/ios-tips-synchronized/

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